Day: October 17, 2016

Boars, Gore, and Swords podcast's ASOIAF book club - FeastDance #11: "Erectile Crustacean"

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The Boars, Gore, and Swords book club continues its reading of the Boiled Leather chapter order combining George R.R. Martin’s A Feast for Crows and A Dance with Dragons with this week’s episode,“Erectile Crustacean.” Ivan and Red cover Brienne III and Samwell II in AFfC, and discuss some light Westworld/Luke Cage views, Brienne’s reenactment of 80s teen movies, and male insensitivity on the high seas.

To catch up on previous television seasons, the A Song of Ice And Fire books, and other TV and movies, check out the BGaS archive. You can find them on Twitter @boarsgoreswords, like their Facebook fanpage, and email them. If you want access to extra episodes and content, you can donate to the Patreon.

This episode is sponsored by Hello Fresh, visit hellofresh.com and use promo code BGS to save $35 off your first week of deliveries.

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Rogue One: a bunch of character posters

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The new Star Wars film, Rogue One has released a bunch of new character posters today. You can download them here.

Brand new character posters from ROGUE ONE: A STAR WARS STORY are here!

Featuring Jyn Erso (Felicity Jones), Captain Cassian Andor (Diego Luna), Director Orson Krennic (Ben Mendelsohn), Chirrut Îmwe (Donnie Yen), K-2SO (Alan Tudyk), Bodhi Rook (Riz Ahmed), with Baze Malbus (Jiang Wen) and Saw Gerrera (Forest Whitaker), these posters are now available to share with your readers.

ROGUE ONE: A STAR WARS STORY is in U.S. theaters December 16 in 3D, RealD 3D, and IMAX 3D!

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Huzzah!?

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Clay mugs that look like old cardboard

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Ceramic artist Tim Kowalczyk makes clay mugs that look like distressed cardboard. From Colossal:

Kowalczyk is drawn to objects of little material value — crushed tin cans, ripped up cardboard, and Polaroids that have been damaged during development. It is in these typical throw aways that he finds beauty, an attraction to the history embedded in their wrinkles and folds. To memorialize these items Kowalczyk creates their likeness in clay, creating works that look exactly like mugs haphazardly formed from cardboard with “Please Handle With Care” stickers still stuck to their sides.

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Three-Body Problem/Google Trips/Puzzles

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Followable:
Cartoonist Danny Hellman did a lot of illustrations for Boing Boing when it was a zine in the 1990s. His Instagram feed reveals his fascination with European cemetery statuary (pictured above), and his photos reveal some striking examples. — Mark Frauenfelder

Readable:
A science fiction novel I really liked is The Three-Body Problem. It is the first Chinese-written novel to win a Hugo award, and it is making waves in China and, in a new English translation, with the rest of the world. Complicated, deep, and seeped in a different view of China, it’s a masterpiece. — Kevin Kelly

Watchable:
I watched the new movie The Jungle Book all the way through without realizing that EVERYTHING in it, except the little boy, was a computer fabrication — a virtuality way beyond Avatar. Incredible. Hundreds of wild animals, hundred of species of plants, the rivers and jungles, were all computer generated and the whole movie “filmed” on a blue-screen stage in LA. It’s a good movie, but even better evidence of where virtual production — and all films — are headed. You can catch it now on Amazon. — KK

Travel:
Google Trips is a brand new app (for iOS and Android) that scans my Gmail for travel and dining reservations to build an itinerary and offer things to do at your destination. It’s worked like a charm so far, identifying every upcoming trip I have planned. It even created summaries for past trips. — MF

Bingeable:
Netflix just released the trailer for the new season of Black Mirror, which comes out Oct. 21. The show is dark. Every episode is a mini-adrenaline rush. It’s become my Twilight Zone fix, since I’ve exhausted all those episodes. You can watch the last two seasons (7 episodes) now. — Claudia Lamar

Stuff:
Pomegranate’s Charley Harper puzzles are beautiful and sturdy. Each piece is glossy and locks well with other pieces, and it’s a fun distraction for a few hours. I’ve bought two so far — Tree of Life and Exquisite Creatures. — CL

Join the 5473 people who get the free Recomendo weekly newsletter a week early by email.

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US woman describes getting detained in Turkey for visa error

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Mary Forgione, a US citizen, was stopped and detained by Turkish border patrol when she attempted to reenter Turkey while on vacation. She wrote about her interesting experience for the LA Times. Takeaway: the State Department won’t help you if you get detained in another country because a border agent forgot to stamp your passport.

Were’s your other passport?” the border agent at Istanbul’s Sabiha Gokcen airport snapped as he waved my U.S. passport.

He was annoyed, but so was I. I didn’t have another passport. The one in his hand was it.

“You came to Istanbul, you didn’t exit and now you are re-entering,” he said slowly, his tone serious. “Where were you?”

But I had exited. Eleven days earlier, I had sailed from the city’s Karakoy port with a group of college friends on a Mediterranean cruise bound for Rome, I told him.

He shook my passport again and said, “Show me! Where does it say that?”

I looked in vain at the pages as he kept hold of my precious U.S. passport. He was right. I didn’t see any stamp that showed I had left Istanbul.

I didn’t understand how this had happened, but he did — or at least he thought he did: He decided I had a second, secret passport that I was hiding. But I didn’t.

Image: Wikipedia

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Rysa Walker's new novel, 'The Delphi Effect'

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Rysa Walker’s Chronos Files series is some of the best time travel science fiction I’ve read in a long time. Her new novel The Delphi Effect deals with the paranormal, and does not disappoint!

The Delphi Effect introduces Anna Morgan, a young woman who has been bounced around foster care and psychiatric institutions for most of her life. Anna can talk to ghosts. Naturally, she runs into a spectre connected to some pretty big secrets and gets embroiled in some tumultuous cloak and dagger shenanigans. Good thing teenagers are well equipped to deal in these situations.

The plot is fun, but with Rysa Walker it is the characters and world building that are so immersive and fantastic. You immediately believe in what is going on, and everything feels natural. You care about these characters, you want to see bad things happen to the bad people, and you cheer on the good regardless how flawed and immature. Teenagers.

Walker writes books that are hard to put down.

The Delphi Effect by Rysa Walker via Amazon

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Figuring out what to do with Trump's base means admitting they are racist

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Dylan Matthews has a wonderful piece up on Vox, Taking Trump voters’ concerns seriously means listening to what they’re actually saying, which points out that in order to heal the great divide in the United States we’re going to have to admit what Trump’s popularity is all about: a fading, racist white majority is struggling to maintain primacy.

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Anarchic Adjustment: pioneering street culture brand revived at L.A. art show

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Anarchic Adjustment was a pioneering streetwear brand and artist collective that emerged from the London punk-skate-BMX-Xerox art scene in the mid-1980s and spread like a virus when founder Nick Philip moved to San Francisco and immersed himself in the early cyberculture. Immediately, Anarchic Adjustment became the clothier-of-choice for the likes of DJ Mixmaster Morris, Joi Ito (now director of MIT Media Lab), Timothy Leary, and countless rave kids and guerrilla art punks. Those were the daze.

Now though, Philip, who in the last decade became best known for his Imaginary Foundation line, has announced an Anarchic Adjustment revival in the form of a sculpture show opening October 20 at Los Angeles’s Seventh Letter Gallery. The highly-anticipated exhibition of new work is titled “The Future is not what is used to be.

“It’s an uncompromising satire of mass distraction, narcissism and the hidden machine lurking in plain sight,” Philip says.

Above, “Little Brother,” inspired by Cory Doctorow’s novel, is an observation of “the feedback loop of surveillance, transparency, and a culture entirely preoccupied with its selfie.” Below, two of my other favorite works from the show, and “Shackled Connectivity” and “I did it for the lulz.”
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The Boing Boing Store's 2 top headphone deals of the week

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The Boing Boing Store features tons of headphones with a range of functionality, quality levels, and prices. Today we’re featuring 2 of the best additions, fresh to the Store this week.

The first set of bluetooth headphones are great for working out or everyday listening, while the wired second set will be really attractive to anyone who is a serious gamer or wants to hunker down in the library at school and get some work done.

#1 SainSonic Wireless HD Stereo Earphones – $15.99

These SainSonic Wireless Earphones feature the latest Bluetooth 4.1 technology, and a design that won’t budge from your ears no matter what you’re doing. They deliver an impressive 6 hours of playtime on a single charge. Plus, with their special nano-coating, the SainSonic earphones work even if when it’s raining outside or during extra sweaty workouts. Best of all, they’re extremely affordable at just $15.99 thanks to our current sale.

#2 SteelSeries 9H Gaming Headset – $99

The SteelSeries 9H Gaming Headset is not only more affordable than standard gaming headsets, but delivers impressive audio, too. For one thing, it comes loaded with Dolby Technology, meaning you get great audio every time you play. The retractable mic and included noise cancellation mean all your mid-game communication will be crisp. And the best part is how refreshingly comfortable this headset is. Get it on sale in the Boing Boing Store for just $99.

Also explore the top Online Courses on our network right now:

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Refugees, Women in Black and the Serbian police

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“You can’t tell who is craziest: the refugees, the police or those women,” said a local shopkeeper. He made a cross over his chest, to express his sincere Serbian bewilderment.

He had just witnessed ten shabby Afghan and Syrian refugees walking past, escorted by ten Women in Black from Serbia, Italy and Spain, themselves escorted by ten policemen and a police car.

By the railway station in downtown Belgrade, the temporary citizens-from-nowhere are living their nomad existences in the the rubble of the so-called Belgrade Waterfront construction project. The refugees loiter all day, hoping for something to happen, between the city bus yards and huge trash-cans full of boxed food that the aid workers supply on a regular basis.

Around five pm there is a kind of tea ceremony where about 800 people gather, most of them arriving from the organized camps where they sleep. They arrive to be heard, to be seen. We Women in Black went to join them to show this Belgrade political scene to our international colleagues.

It’ s been now two years since the Syrian refugee crisis seized headlines, but the refugees are not entirely Syrians, but a global peoples’ market of Afghans and Nigerians as well. In the beginning there were many more refugees, and far less aid from the locals and the Serbian state. The migrants were simply collapsing on flat surfaces anywhere in Belgrade, urban nooks, parks and lots where they ate, drank and slept.

Now the bus-station square, a favorite place to cluster for obvious reasons, has been fenced and organized. The police are everywhere and a routine has been invented for the nomads. Its scope is international: border walls are being erected around Serbia, blocking the paths into Schengen Europe, where of course the refugees long to go. They come from the perilous South, the imagine safety in the West, and Balkan Serbia is only a transit zone.

I spoke to some : they are 90 percent young men. They aspire to reach France, Germany, Italy and Spain. They have addresses and phone numbers of relatives and allies in those countries, but they have no transit papers and no money.

A Nigerian young man confided me: “Money is the only real problem. If I had the money for travel, trust me: no walls or police could stop me.” I believed him, because, although money cannot buy you a happy life, it can swiftly bail you out of misery, in war and in peace.

I remember how I myself smuggled chocolate into wartime Serbia from Hungary by handing cash to the customs officers. Chocolate was pure joy for Serbian children living under sanctions. The same applied to toilet paper, diesel fuel, gasoline, cigarettes, liquor…

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Japanese Tattoos – Full of traditional and modern designs, characters and history in this photo-heavy book

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My skin doesn’t have a single tattoo, but I am touched by the art in tattoos, particularly traditional ones. The Japanese have a long and deep affinity for skin paintings, and have devised a complex iconography for them. The Japanese were early to pioneer color in tattoos, and gave high regard for the full body tattoo, treating the whole torso as a canvas. They even went recursive, sometimes inking a large character that sported a full-body tattoo within the tattoo. This book is chock full of classic themes, characters, and designs, with plenty of notes on the historical significance of tattoo culture. Of course it’s great inspiration for modern tattoos, but also for any other visual art.

Japanese Tattoos: History, Culture, Design

by Brian Ashcraft and Hori Benny

Tuttle Publishing

2016, 160 pages, 7.5 x 10 x 0.7 inches (softcover)

$11 Buy a copy on Amazon

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Slow Cooker Shredded Chicken Chili

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This slow cooker chicken chili recipe is for those days when you would really like to just throw a bunch of ingredients in a pot, wave a magic wand, and have dinner ready exactly on time. That would be nice, right?!

There’s no magic wand (unfortunately), but thanks to the slow cooker, the rest of this recipe comes pretty darn close to granting that wish.

Continue reading “Slow Cooker Shredded Chicken Chili” »

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Judge throws off robe, kicks ass in court after defendant struggles with officer

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https://youtu.be/jEMz_LyLlkc

His name is McBain. Judge McBain. If you’re a walking protection order violation trying to intimidate your victim in court, God will not save you from the contempt citations, or indeed the whirling limbs, of Judge McBain.

A court officer seen in the video told Mlive.com that as he tried to take Larson into custody, the defendant “tensed up” and tried to fight him. Larson and the officer, identified by Mlive.com as Jared Schultz, struggled as Larson continued to point and talk to the woman.

“Tell me to leave you alone!” he said. “Tell him right now!”

“Tase his a– right now!” McBain shouted, as he threw off his judge’s robe, ran over to the two men and then physically helped pin Larson to the ground. Throughout the scuffle, Larson is heard cursing periodically.

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White nationalist scion leaves the cause

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Derek, 27, was set to follow in the footsteps of his dad, Stormfront creator Don Black. He had his own white nationalist website for kids, his own radio show, and gotten elected to local government in Florida. He was their future, slick and self-controlled, never using slurs or suggestions of violence. But he’s now come to question the ideology and left it all behind. Eli Saslow reports on The white flight of Derek Black.

So many others in white nationalism had come to their conclusions out of anger and fear, but Derek tended to like most people he met, regardless of race. Instead, he sought out logic and science to confirm his worldview, reading studies from conservative think tanks about biological differences between races, IQ disparities and rates of violent crime committed by blacks against whites

They sent him to a top liberal arts college thinking he would educate them. But with long red hair and a cowboy hat and garrulous personality, he became popular and found himself hiding his association with Stormfront, and his beliefs, rather than expounding them.

When another student mentioned that he had been reading about the racist implications of “Lord of the Rings” on a website called Stormfront, Derek pretended he had never heard of it.

But he kept up the radio show and was soon outed. Instead of ostracizing him, though, his friends and college acquaintances decided to stay in touch and include him. One, an orthodox Jew, invited him to a Shabbat dinner.

And Derek went, and that’s where it all started.

This article is well-worth 20 minutes of your time.

The white flight of Derek Black [WaPo]

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Galaxy Note 7 now banned from air travel

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Withdrawn by Samsung and recalled from store shelves, the explosion-prone Galaxy Note 7 is now forbidden in the skies. The Federal Aviation Administration has officially banned it, via an emergency prohibition order, making it a federal crime to take one on board an airplane.

The order restricts passengers from carrying the phone “on their person, in carry-on baggage, in checked baggage, or as cargo,” and says that anyone who inadvertently brings one on a plane must power it down immediately. Carriers are also required to “deny boarding to a passenger in possession” of the phone.

Passengers who bring a Note 7 onto a plane are “subject to civil penalties of up to $179,933 for each violation for each day they are found to be in violation (49 U.S.C. 5123),” and could be prosecuted, which could “result in fines under title 18, imprisonment of up to ten years, or both (49 U.S.C. 5124).”

It is already a cult object, ready to take its place among the more dangerous inhabitants of our descendants’ wunderkammers.

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Price of Marmite, tasty British slime, at heart of latest Brexit imbroglio

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Marmite is a popular, exceedingly British food product spread on toast, crackers or directly onto one’s tongue. It is dark, sticky, and delivers a stark “love it or hate it” kick to the tastebuds. Marmite originated in the thick, yeasty dregs generated by beer production; Bovril, its great enemy on the British condiment aisle, was made in similar fashion from slaughterhouse goop. And thanks to Brexit, there is a Marmite shortage and pricing run.

When a nation’s currency suddenly falls in value, as the pound has since the Brexit vote, imports cost more. This means prices in the shops will inevitably rise. Most people can grasp that simple, frictionless, model. Yet the Marmite affair highlights that there are many other economic factors involved and that things are (rather like the polarising “yeast extract” itself) stickier in practise.

Marmite is manufactured in Burton upon Trent. This fact prompted provoked accusations of “profiteering” from some Tory MPs and right-wing newspapers. “How can a falling pound justify a price hike for a UK-made product?” they demanded to know. Some suggested that this must be a plot by Anglo-Dutch Unilever to discredit Brexit.

But Unilever does not solely manufacture Marmite. It has reduced its transaction costs and increased its profit margins by bringing a wide range of consumer products into a single multinational business.

Photo: Kent Fredric (CC-BY-2.0)

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