Day: July 10, 2018

The Little-Known Peer Feedback Strategies You Can Use in The Classroom

In every level of the education system, students are provided with assignments which help teachers to evaluate them. Now, for effective learning, it is necessary to give feedback to the students. It can help them understand the mistakes committed, which can then improve their knowledge and skills. It can also make a student more confident and enthusiastic when it comes to learning.

There’s a handful of benefits of peer feedback. However, even though this process is very effective, implementing it in the classroom is not that easy. There are many challenges that a teacher must face. The list includes reluctance from the students, non-specific feedback, and more.

In order to implement effective peer reviews, the following measures can be taken:

Make sure everybody takes part

peer feedback participation

It will not make any sense if only one or two students give feedback. You must encourage everyone to get involved. Tell the students to participate in the program.

Ask them to be specific

Students should be taught how to give constructive feedback. This is to help the students learn how to improve their work.

Giving a two-word review will not be enough. The feedback needs to be specific and it should focus exactly where a student needs to work on or in what area has one excelled in. This process requires the students to think critically, enabling them to hone this skill.

Provide a rubric

To help a student in providing constructive feedback, it is important to have a specific rubric or guideline. This way, they will know where they need to focus on while reflecting on their peer’s work. A rubric will also assist them to understand what can be considered as a good work, and they can create their own feedback based on that standard.

Use technology

peer feedback technology

Utilizing a user-friendly, engaging, and fun platform will make the process of peer review more enjoyable for the students. And as a result, student participation will also increase.

See Also: Technology in the Classroom — Should Technology Take Over The Education System?

Track results

Teachers should also keep track of the feedback and the students giving the reviews. This way, they have a way of checking if the system has been productive or not.

Peer feedback is very effective for teaching and learning. With proper implementation, students get the chance to think about their own learning and learn what they can do to improve themselves.

This process is also great for the teachers since they don’t usually have enough time to give a personal feedback to each student. By using these techniques, teachers can implement an effective peer feedback system and create a great classroom culture.

The post The Little-Known Peer Feedback Strategies You Can Use in The Classroom appeared first on Dumb Little Man.

Try This! 4 Great Add-Ins for Hummus

When you are pondering an appetizer for a party, you can never go wrong with hummus. It’s popular with kids and adults, it’s easy to make in quantities large or small, and it’s highly adaptable.

Earthy, savory, creamy, protein-packed: hummus is a great base for all kinds of add-ins.

Sure there are a bunch of pre-made flavor variations available at the store, but it’s so easy to make your own “house” version. Then you not only have a crowd-pleasing party appetizer (or snack), you also have bragging rights!

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Grab co-founder says Southeast Asia still has plenty of competition despite Uber’s exit

Grab may have bought itself a dominant position in Southeast Asia through its acquisition of Uber’s regional business, but the company still believes there’s competition in the ride-hailing space despite what consumers may feel.

But Grab customers aren’t alone in feeling that the Grab-Uber deal is detrimental, the Competition and Consumer Commission Singapore (CCCS) last week expressed concern that the tie-up is hurting consumers and that a lack of competition will reduce innovation. The watchdog is in the process of an investigation into the deal which could see it dish out fines for Uber and Grab, or potentially unwind the deal in Singapore altogether.

Despite that threat looming, Grab co-founder Hooi Ling Tan told an audience at the Rise conference in Hong Kong that the market, and ride-hailing more generally, remains competitive in Southeast Asia despite Uber’s exit.

“There’s still a lot of existing competition, we don’t foresee it ending ever.. and to be honest we don’t want it to because we continue to learn from them,” Tan said. “We continue to learn from alternative players who take alternative strategies [and] operational tactics.”

Go-Jek, the billion-dollar firm that dominates Indonesia and is plotting a regional expansion to fill Uber’s void, may be the most obvious rival, but Tan said that Grab is competing with more basic forces.

“From day one, our primary competitor has never been other ride-hailing apps, it’s actually been what [Grab CEO Anthony Tan] calls the hand — the hand that waves down a taxi on the side of the road,” Tan, who is not related to the Grab CEO, said. “That market is huge, [and it is something] we’re trying to provide an alternative service to because it isn’t exactly efficient as is.”

10 July 2018; Tan Hooi Ling, left, Co-Founder, Grab, and Kara Swisher, Executive Editor, Recode, on Centre Stage during day one of RISE 2018 at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre in Hong Kong. Photo by Stephen McCarthy / RISE via Sportsfile

CCCS, the Singaporean watchdog, doesn’t agree, however. Last week it expressed concern that no other taxi apps rival Grab and that a prohibitive barrier of cost and network effects prevents new entrants from competing squarely. A lack of competition has already led to Grab raising prices, it argued, although Grab has denied doing so.

Tan didn’t comment directly on the regulator’s comments, but she did say at a subsequent press briefing that regulating ride-hailing is a tricky process.

“We’re all trying to figure out what’s the right way to balance the needs of the consumer and need to create an environment that’s supportive of innovation,” she said. “Together we’re trying to figure things out, we make mistakes together but are 100 percent combined in terms of our intent.”

An entity with which Grab is more unexpectedly combined with is Uber, and Tan’s comments certainly paint the relationship between the once-sworn enemies as a very pally one.

“The partnership makes a tonne of sense to us because we saw [Uber] as really true potential partners,” Tan said. “For example some of the things that they’ve been helping us a lot on… they have Uber Eats in Southeast Asia, which we didn’t have, and since we’ve helped take over their operations we’ve helped them expand it from two countries to six countries right now with a bunch more growth expansion plans.

“They’ve also had some of the best technology know-how, whether it’s mapping or just basic scaling infrastructure, those are some of the other things we’ve continued learned from them,” she added.

Tan said that Uber and Grab are educating each other on how their respective businesses are developing, and on that note Grab today went beyond ride-hailing with the launch of its “super app” that integrates third-party services. Uber has embraced scooters with its acquisition of Jump Bikes, but it will take some imagining for the ride-hailing giant to adopt non-transportation services like Grab’s push into payment and financial services.

But then that’s entirely the point of its Southeast Asia exit. It’s widely-believed that Uber left Southeast Asia’s loss-making market to clean its balance sheet ahead of a future IPO. Nonetheless, it got a solid 27.5 percent share in Grab in return and with the Singapore-based firm in the process of raising capital at a valuation of over $10 billion, Uber is already reaping the rewards on paper.

Grab raised $1 billion from Toyota last month and that is the first tranche of a larger fundraising effort to support the one-stop “super app” strategy in Southeast Asia’s post-Uber world.

Jimmy Kimmel finally responds to Trump’s bizarre rally rant — with a fact check

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Jimmy Kimmel has been pretty quiet about Donald Trump’s recent vendetta against late night show hosts.

During a rally for South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster, Trump called Stephen Colbert a “low life,” Jimmy Fallon a “lost soul,” and Kimmel “terrible.” But unlike Colbert and Fallon, Kimmel had yet to respond. 

Now we know why — he was off-grid, on summer vacation with his family in the Bob Marshall Wilderness, Montana with no service. But Kimmel finally responded to Trump on Monday night, with a big ol’ fact check.

During the rally speech, Trump told a longwinded story about his experience on Jimmy Kimmel Live! pre-election, that included a claim that the late show host reverently waited out on Hollywood Boulevard for Trump, and apparently visited him in his dressing room before the show. Read more…

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