Day: December 11, 2019

Blue Origin moves closer to human spaceflight with 12th New Shepard launch

Jeff Bezos -founded Blue Origin has recorded another successful mission for its New Shepard sub-orbital launch vehicle, which is a key step as it readies the spacecraft for human spaceflight. This is also the sixth flight of this re-used booster, which is a record for Blue Origin in terms of relying on and recovering one of its rocket stages.

This is the ninth time that Blue Origin has flown commercial payloads aboard New Shepard, and each launch moves it one step closer to demonstrating the system’s readiness for carrying crew on board. This launch carried experimental payloads that will be used for research, including materials used in student studies. It also had thousands of postcards on board written by students from around the world, which were submitted to the Club for the Future nonprofit set up by Blue Origin earlier this year to provide educational resources about space to schools and students.

Blue Origin intends to fly paying space tourists aboard New Shepard eventually, along with other commercial astronauts making the trip for research and other missions. Up to six passengers can fit in Blue Origin’s capsule atop the New Shepard, but we don’t yet know when it’ll actually be carrying anyone on board, either for testing or for commercial flights.

Golfing Injury Prevention Methods Suggested By Chiropractors

Most people are aware of how fleeting the summer can be, particularly golfers. As such, if you enjoy golfing during the short summer season, you may be worried about injuring yourself while on the course. In fact, many golfers worry about potentially season-ending injuries.

Unfortunately, injuries occur more often than not. In fact, studies have found that roughly 70% of golfers have suffered from at least one injury during their careers.

Furthermore, while it is true that most golf-related injuries are relatively minor, approximately half are chronic injuries. This means that they will get worse with time unless they are treated properly.

Fortunately, there are steps you can take to help prevent such injuries from occurring in the first place. Here are tips on preventing golf injuries.

Focus on Your Endurance

Did you know that walking on a golf course equates to about a ten-km hike? Hence, you will need to have great cardio endurance and overall fitness levels if you want to make the long trek across the course.

If you are having trouble traversing the terrain, then you can try going on brisk walks about thrice a week. Then, slowly amp up the intensity of your walks, as well as the distance covered over the next few months.

Also, we would suggest that you try and avoid using a golf cart whenever possible. Walking on the course serves as a great form of exercise.

Rectify Any Swing Issues

preventing golf injury

Every golf swing that you take incorporates complex and unique motions that trigger several muscular contractions in the body. Moreover, each swing also places stress or strain on your lead arm and your lower back. You will want to correct any swing issues that can lead to injuries down the road.

For instance, you can work on your swing by swinging in a fluid and relaxed motion. It should also be noted that your joint motion range, as well as muscular strength, will need to be optimized in every core joint and muscle component. This is one important tip in preventing golf injuries.

Don’t Forget to Warm Up

The vast majority of golf-related injuries are triggered by overuse.

You should focus on augmenting the intensity of your swing or drive in a progressive manner instead of trying to overextend. To do so, you should begin with just a small bucket of golf balls. Opt for an eight or nine iron, or a similar short club, when you hit the golf balls.

In addition, you should commence with easy swings, and we would recommend that you perform some rotation-based exercises that focus on the shoulder, trunk, and hip regions when you are creating your warm-up routine.

Select the Right Equipment

The golf clubs that you pick should match your unique body size and contours in order to reduce the risk of injuries. If you select a club that is a poor fit, then your swing will be impeded. You will have trouble swinging in an efficient manner. If you are in doubt in terms of what size will best fit you, then speak to a golf expert about the matter.

In addition, upper limb stress issues may result if you typically hit off of driving range mats or other such synthetic terrains. Most golfers tend to make contact with the surface before, during, and after having made an impact with the golf ball. As a result, you may incur shoulder, elbow, and/or wrist injuries that are caused by egregious and repetitive stress.

Visit a Chiropractor or Physiotherapist If You Are Injured

preventing golf injuries chiropractor

In some cases, patients with a pre-existing condition or injury may exacerbate their problem while playing a game of golf.

If the aforementioned scenario applies to you, then visiting a chiropractor or physical therapist may help. For instance, your chiropractor or physiotherapist may provide customized adaptations and/or treatment modalities that will allow you to continue playing the game that you love with minimal issues.

Moreover, they will be able to provide you with the information that you need to have a better grasp of how your golfing has a direct impact or influence on your body. In any event, if you suffer an injury while playing a round of golf, then seeing a physical therapist or chiropractor may allow you to get back on the course in record time. You will also not require a referral from your physician in most cases in order to see a chiropractor or physiotherapist.

See Also: 10 Ways You Can Benefit From Chiropractic Adjustments

Preventing Golf Injuries: Warm-Up Exercises That You Can Do

You should always warm up before you begin golfing. The quintessential warm up routine will usually only take about 15 minutes to perform.

To begin, you should perform an activity that is of low intensity. It must incorporate several different muscle groups at once. You can also further boost your cardio and endurance levels by parking at the furthest end of the lot.

Next, focus on stretching exercises that emphasize the muscles that you use before each swing. You should also gently hold each stretch for about 15 seconds. Focus primarily on your forearm, neck, back, shoulder, and hip muscle regions.

golfing infographic

Infographic Source

The post Golfing Injury Prevention Methods Suggested By Chiropractors appeared first on Dumb Little Man.

Golfing Injury Prevention Methods Suggested By Chiropractors

Most people are aware of how fleeting the summer can be, particularly golfers. As such, if you enjoy golfing during the short summer season, you may be worried about injuring yourself while on the course. In fact, many golfers worry about potentially season-ending injuries.

Unfortunately, injuries occur more often than not. In fact, studies have found that roughly 70% of golfers have suffered from at least one injury during their careers.

Furthermore, while it is true that most golf-related injuries are relatively minor, approximately half are chronic injuries. This means that they will get worse with time unless they are treated properly.

Fortunately, there are steps you can take to help prevent such injuries from occurring in the first place. Here are tips on preventing golf injuries.

Focus on Your Endurance

Did you know that walking on a golf course equates to about a ten-km hike? Hence, you will need to have great cardio endurance and overall fitness levels if you want to make the long trek across the course.

If you are having trouble traversing the terrain, then you can try going on brisk walks about thrice a week. Then, slowly amp up the intensity of your walks, as well as the distance covered over the next few months.

Also, we would suggest that you try and avoid using a golf cart whenever possible. Walking on the course serves as a great form of exercise.

Rectify Any Swing Issues

preventing golf injury

Every golf swing that you take incorporates complex and unique motions that trigger several muscular contractions in the body. Moreover, each swing also places stress or strain on your lead arm and your lower back. You will want to correct any swing issues that can lead to injuries down the road.

For instance, you can work on your swing by swinging in a fluid and relaxed motion. It should also be noted that your joint motion range, as well as muscular strength, will need to be optimized in every core joint and muscle component. This is one important tip in preventing golf injuries.

Don’t Forget to Warm Up

The vast majority of golf-related injuries are triggered by overuse.

You should focus on augmenting the intensity of your swing or drive in a progressive manner instead of trying to overextend. To do so, you should begin with just a small bucket of golf balls. Opt for an eight or nine iron, or a similar short club, when you hit the golf balls.

In addition, you should commence with easy swings, and we would recommend that you perform some rotation-based exercises that focus on the shoulder, trunk, and hip regions when you are creating your warm-up routine.

Select the Right Equipment

The golf clubs that you pick should match your unique body size and contours in order to reduce the risk of injuries. If you select a club that is a poor fit, then your swing will be impeded. You will have trouble swinging in an efficient manner. If you are in doubt in terms of what size will best fit you, then speak to a golf expert about the matter.

In addition, upper limb stress issues may result if you typically hit off of driving range mats or other such synthetic terrains. Most golfers tend to make contact with the surface before, during, and after having made an impact with the golf ball. As a result, you may incur shoulder, elbow, and/or wrist injuries that are caused by egregious and repetitive stress.

Visit a Chiropractor or Physiotherapist If You Are Injured

preventing golf injuries chiropractor

In some cases, patients with a pre-existing condition or injury may exacerbate their problem while playing a game of golf.

If the aforementioned scenario applies to you, then visiting a chiropractor or physical therapist may help. For instance, your chiropractor or physiotherapist may provide customized adaptations and/or treatment modalities that will allow you to continue playing the game that you love with minimal issues.

Moreover, they will be able to provide you with the information that you need to have a better grasp of how your golfing has a direct impact or influence on your body. In any event, if you suffer an injury while playing a round of golf, then seeing a physical therapist or chiropractor may allow you to get back on the course in record time. You will also not require a referral from your physician in most cases in order to see a chiropractor or physiotherapist.

See Also: 10 Ways You Can Benefit From Chiropractic Adjustments

Preventing Golf Injuries: Warm-Up Exercises That You Can Do

You should always warm up before you begin golfing. The quintessential warm up routine will usually only take about 15 minutes to perform.

To begin, you should perform an activity that is of low intensity. It must incorporate several different muscle groups at once. You can also further boost your cardio and endurance levels by parking at the furthest end of the lot.

Next, focus on stretching exercises that emphasize the muscles that you use before each swing. You should also gently hold each stretch for about 15 seconds. Focus primarily on your forearm, neck, back, shoulder, and hip muscle regions.

golfing infographic

Infographic Source

The post Golfing Injury Prevention Methods Suggested By Chiropractors appeared first on Dumb Little Man.

Introducing ‘Dear Sophie,’ an advice column for U.S.-bound immigrant employees

Sophie Alcorn
Contributor

Sophie Alcorn is the founder of Alcorn Immigration Law in Silicon Valley and 2019 Global Law Experts Awards’ “Law Firm of the Year in California for Entrepreneur Immigration Services.” She connects people with the businesses and opportunities that expand their lives.

Extra Crunch is excited to announce the launch of “Dear Sophie,” an advice column with answers for all your questions on attracting, hiring and retaining immigrant employees — and more.

Dear Sophie is a collaborative forum hosted by ExtraCrunch and curated by Sophie Alcorn, certified as a Specialist Attorney in Immigration and Nationality Law by the State Bar of California Board of Legal Specialization. Sophie is the founder of Alcorn Immigration Law, the fastest-growing immigration law firm in Silicon Valley and 2019 Global Law Experts Awards’ “Law Firm of the Year in California for Entrepreneur Immigration Services.”


Dear Reader,

As I pack my bags to speak at TechCrunch Disrupt in Berlin this week, I’m happy to announce the first edition of my new column, Dear Sophie. I’m excited to answer your questions about U.S. immigration!

And, If you’re in the area, I invite you to join me at Disrupt Berlin 2019. You can use promo code ALCORN for discounted admission and meet me in person for a free consultation with CrunchMatch, or attend one of my two sessions: 

Hope to see you there,

Sophie


Dear Sophie: I’m scared: I feel like I should really be in Silicon Valley to grow my company, but everything I read about immigration makes it sound so hard. Is my dream possible?

— Dreaming in Dresden

Dear Dreaming: Yes, coming to the U.S. to build a startup is absolutely possible. In fact, I see founders like you do it all the time. Your dream is valid and definitely worth pursuing.

The first piece of advice I’d give you is to be careful about which news sources you trust! You might not be getting the whole story. While dramatic changes are taking place in the United States, we still have a functioning immigration system that allows people to come live and work here — people just like you. 

The second piece of advice I have is to research the many visa and green card options that can allow you to come to the United States and grow your company (you can read about them on my blog). You’ll find that some visas grant you the ability to work for the short-term or the long-term (potentially), and some allow you to visit and see what things are like here. 

With these visas, you can find a co-founder and build the early stage of your company, establish a U.S. branch of your existing business, seek venture capital and so much more. 

The third piece of advice I have is to really clarify why you want to come to America — that way, you can be strategic about achieving your goals. You might require a little guidance here, which is one example of where immigration lawyers like myself can be helpful. 

When I meet people in your situation, I reassure them that, not only are they safe to dream with me, but I’ve also helped hundreds of people just like them realize their dreams, even when they didn’t believe it was possible. Almost everybody who comes here once asked the same questions you’re asking.

My last piece of advice is simply to follow your heart. The world needs your ideas and contributions. There are lots of resources and ways to get informed and educated, which is the first step on this journey. Once you have a clear vision, you can work to make your dream a reality — It’s not always easy, but where there’s a will, there’s a way.

You’ve already asked for help, which is a great way to get started. I wish you the best!

Dear Sophie: I have a startup that has been quite successful in Germany. What’s the best way for me to spend some time in the United States exploring product-market fit, gauging business development, and talking to venture capitalists?

— Founder in Frankfurt

Dear Founder: Congratulations on your startup! And bravo for considering taking steps toward strengthening the U.S. marketplace. 

The first thing I suggest you decide is how long it will likely take for you to accomplish your goals. 

If you think you can get the answers you need in less than 90 days, the answer is pretty simple: apply for ESTA (Electronic System for Travel Authorization), which is available to citizens of about 40 countries (including Germany). You’re allowed to visit for business or pleasure with ESTA, but you’re not allowed to work — and you must definitely depart the United States before the end of the authorized period. 

ESTA could be great for a short business trip or a brief accelerator program in Silicon Valley. Be careful with programs that run longer than 90 days. I’ve seen founders in these longer programs leave on day 88 to go back home for a week and then return to the U.S. to complete the program, hoping that this is a safe workaround of the time limit. Remember that ESTA is a non-immigrant status, and if Customs and Border Protection suspects that you are trying to live here or work here, they have the authority to deny your entry to the United States. 

On the other hand, if you know you’ll need to spend 4-6 months in the U.S. without interruption, I suggest you talk to an attorney about the possibility of applying for a B-1/B-2 visitor visa (even if you have ESTA). A visitor visa allows you to stay in the U.S. for up to six months on a single visit. 

People often ask me how long they can stay in the U.S. during a calendar year or how long they need to be outside of the United States after a six-month visit. While there is no fixed answer to these questions, I remind them that ESTA, B-1, and B-2 are non-immigrant statuses, Customs and Border Protection has the authority to deny you entry if you appear to be living or working in the U.S. In my experience, reentry seems OK when people are spending less than 50% of the time in the country as visitors. Still, it’s always best to talk with an attorney about your particular situation. For example, sometimes our clients request that we provide them with letters of support explaining why their trip is temporary, which they can show to the officers at the airport if they get questioned.

I encourage people in your situation to at least come for 90 days. It’s a great opportunity to network, have some great conversations, and clarify your long-term goals in the U.S. Take some time to think about it, reach out online, so you have things set up before you arrive, and plan out your finances so you can make the most of your trip. I’m wishing you every success!

Dear Sophie: I am a venture capitalist, and my fund recently had great success. We’re now raising a second round and building out the infrastructure of our organization. I have a brilliant contractor working for me who scouts new startups. She was born in India, just got her Bachelor’s degree in Computer Science from an Ivy League university, and was also recently accepted back into a Master’s program there. I want to help her plan for her future. Can she keep working for me after OPT, or should she go back to school? How do these choices affect her prospects for short-term and long-term chances for immigration?

— Venture in Venice Beach

People don’t like working at Facebook as much as they used to

People don't like working at Facebook as much as they used to

Facebook’s status as one of the most desirable employers is waning. That’s according to Glassdoor’s latest rankings of the best companies to work for, based on anonymous employee reviews.

Glassdoor released its annual “Best Places to Work” list for 2020, which compiles employees’ anonymous ratings and reviews on Glassdoor, though the actual rankings are determined by the company’s “proprietary awards algorithm.” 

This year, Facebook’s position on the list of the top 100 organizations dropped to No. 23, down from No. 7 in 2019 and No. 1 in 2018. That’s a new low for the company, which has consistently ranked near the top of Glassdoor’s list. The first year the social network made the cut, in 2011, it nabbed the top spot. Since then, Facebook has ranked in the top ten every year, except for 2015, when it hit No. 13.  Read more…

More about Tech, Facebook, Glassdoor, Big Tech Companies, and Tech

People don’t like working at Facebook as much as they used to

People don't like working at Facebook as much as they used to

Facebook’s status as one of the most desirable employers is waning. That’s according to Glassdoor’s latest rankings of the best companies to work for, based on anonymous employee reviews.

Glassdoor released its annual “Best Places to Work” list for 2020, which compiles employees’ anonymous ratings and reviews on Glassdoor, though the actual rankings are determined by the company’s “proprietary awards algorithm.” 

This year, Facebook’s position on the list of the top 100 organizations dropped to No. 23, down from No. 7 in 2019 and No. 1 in 2018. That’s a new low for the company, which has consistently ranked near the top of Glassdoor’s list. The first year the social network made the cut, in 2011, it nabbed the top spot. Since then, Facebook has ranked in the top ten every year, except for 2015, when it hit No. 13.  Read more…

More about Tech, Facebook, Glassdoor, Big Tech Companies, and Tech