Day: June 17, 2020

LinkedIn Dos and Don’ts: LinkedIn’s Best Practices

LinkedIn is the largest online professional networking platform. It’s only wise to make use of it the right way. If someone is only using it as an online resume, then they are missing out on a lot of opportunities.

LinkedIn not only help to recruit people faster, but it also helps professionals increase their network faster. Some common mistakes can prevent LinkedIn users from utilizing LinkedIn’s benefits. Avoid these mistakes to avail its many advantages.

Creating a LinkedIn Profile and Disappearing

creating linkedin profile

One of the biggest mistakes for those who want to expand their network is not even using LinkedIn. Many users sign up for LinkedIn to have an online resume, and right after, they become inactive. Some users only visit their profile once a month or very occasionally.

If you’re barely active, it is likely to lose many opportunities to connect with industry leaders, recruiting agencies, and hiring managers.

By being active on LinkedIn and optimizing profile, you can attract more referrals, build stronger network, and get more opportunities.

Having a Bland Profile

Creating a profile is not enough. When optimizing LinkedIn profile, take opportunities to reveal your personal brand: skills, specialities, etc. Using the default headline given by LinkedIn and only listing your most recent position, title and company information will reduce the chances of your profile to appear in the LinkedIn search results. Optimizing your LinkedIn profile entails more of the basics, such as adding relevant keywords and coming up with an engrossing headline.

Also consider that when creating a LinkedIn profile, it should be visible. It is obvious that some details can be kept hidden from public, but it is not advisable to hide everything. This will defy the purpose of creating a profile in the first place. Motivating every LinkedIn and other users to be in your network before they visit your profile is an amazing idea to grow your network.

You want to help the recruiters to understand that you are the right candidate for them. That is why the Headline, Current Experience and Details, Summary, Past Experience, and Educational Qualification sections should be visible to the public. Otherwise, it is likely that hiring managers will move on to other LinkedIn candidates with more optimized profiles.

Sharing Posts/Photos that Aren’t Career-Related

using linkedin

LinkedIn, by first interpretation, is a social networking site. But it is quite different from Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. For these social networking sites, the primary focus is to connect with friends and socialize. In LinkedIn, the main goal is the same: to connect with social users – only the environment will be more professional.

Therefore, LinkedIn is not the site to share images of your food or pets. It is a network of business professionals who exist to keep up with industry trends and updates. Use LinkedIn to learn more about professional skills and grow your network.

Do not use your LinkedIn news feeds like other social network (Facebook or Twitter). LinkedIn is to attract more professional audience for your business. Its primary goal is to grow professionally. Therefore, business audience will not prefer to view images, videos, and posts that are not relevant to them.

Not Following LinkedIn Etiquette

Even though the objective is to make the most out of LinkedIn, it never means you should send invitations to everyone. By doing so, your account may get labelled as spam. Instead, only try to connect with LinkedIn users who will also mutually get advantages. A good rule of thumb is to send a connect request to the people who you already know or those who are more likely to accept it.

LinkedIn users should make some of the first connections with the family members, friends, and friends of family, previous and current co-workers, managers, classmates, and colleagues before sending to prospects and customers.

Sending invitations to everyone on LinkedIn and not keeping in mind mutual benefits will not help in adding value to your social or business network.

Another common LinkedIn etiquette is not to complain about your boss or a leader at your workplace. LinkedIn is not the place to comment on your workplace.

Thus, these are the simple yet common mistake that many LinkedIn users make. You may want to refrain from doing them to get the most value out of the LinkedIn platform. If LinkedIn is used properly, a user can open up a world of new opportunities.

The post LinkedIn Dos and Don’ts: LinkedIn’s Best Practices appeared first on Dumb Little Man.

African payment startup Chipper Cash raises $13.8M Series A

African cross-border fintech startup Chipper Cash has closed a $13.8 million Series A funding round led by Deciens Capital and plans to hire 30 new staff globally.

The raise caps an event filled run for the San Francisco based payments company, founded two years ago by Ugandan Ham Serunjogi and Ghanaian Maijid Moujaled.

The two came to America for academics, met in Iowa while studying at Grinnell College and ventured out to Silicon Valley for stints in big tech: Facebook for Serunjogi and Flickr and Yahoo! for Moujaled.

The startup call beckoned and after launching Chipper Cash in 2018, the duo convinced 500 Startups and and Liquid 2 Ventures — co-founded by American football legend Joe Montana — to back their company with seed funds.

Two years and $22 million in total capital raised later, Chipper Cash offers its mobile-based, no fee, P2P payment services in seven countries: Ghana, Uganda, Nigeria, Tanzania, Rwanda, South Africa and Kenya.

“We’re now at over one and a half million users and doing over a $100 million dollars a month in volume,” Serunjogi told TechCrunch on a call.

Chipper Cash does not release audited financial data, but does share internal performance accounting with investors. Deciens Capital and Raptor Group co-led the startup’s Series A financing, with repeat support from 500 Startups and Liquid 2 Ventures .

Deciens Capital founder Dan Kimmerling confirmed the fund’s lead on the investment and review of Chipper Cash’s payment value and volume metrics.

Parallel to its P2P app, the startup also runs Chipper Checkout: a merchant-focused, fee-based mobile payment product that generates the revenue to support Chipper Cash’s free mobile-money business.

The company will use its latest round to hire up to 30 people across operations in San Francisco, Lagos, London, Nairobi and New York — according to Serunjogi.

Image Credits: Chipper Cash

Chipper Cash has already brought on a new compliance officer, Lisa Dawson, whose background includes stints with the U.S. Department of Treasury’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network and Citigroup’s anti-money laundering department.

“You know in the world we live in the AML side is very important so it’s an area that we want to invest in from the get go,” said Serunjogi.

He confirmed Dawson’s role aligned with getting Chipper Cash ready to meet regulatory requirements for new markets, but declined to name specific countries.

With the round announcement, Chipper Cash also revealed a corporate social responsibility component to its business. Related to current U.S. events, the startup has formed the Chipper Fund for Black Lives.

“We’ve been huge beneficiaries of the generosity and openness of this country and its entrepreneurial spirit,” explained Serunjogi. “But growing up in Africa, we’ve were able to navigate [the U.S.] without the traumas and baggage our African American friends have gone through living in America.”

The Chipper Fund for Black Lives will give 5 to 10 grants of $5,000 to $10,000. “The plan is to give that to…people or causes who are furthering social justice reforms,” said Serunjogi.

In Africa, Chipper Cash has placed itself in the continent’s major digital payments markets. As a sector, fintech has become Africa’s highest funded tech space, receiving the bulk of an estimated $2 billion in VC that went to startups in 2019.

Africa Top VC Markets 2019

Image Credits: TechCrunch

Those ventures, and a number of the continent’s established banks, are in a race to build market share through financial inclusion.

By several estimates — including The Global Findex Database — the continent is home to the largest percentage of the world’s unbanked population, with a sizable number of underbanked consumers and SMEs.

Increasingly, Nigeria has become the most significant fintech market in Africa, with the continent’s largest economy and population of 200 million.

Chipper Cash expanded there in 2019 and faces competition from a number of players, including local payments venture Paga. More recently, outside entrants have jumped into Nigeria’s fintech scene.

In 2019, Chinese investors put $220 million into OPay (owned by Opera) and PalmPay — two fledgling startups with plans to scale first in West Africa and then the broader continent.

Over the next several years, expect to see market events — such as fails, acquisitions, or IPOs — determine how well funded fintech startups, including Chipper Cash, fare in Africa’s fintech arena.