Day: June 24, 2020

How To Let Go Of Things That Cause You Stress

One of the few things you will experience in life is emotional stress. Inevitable as it is, the question is how to get through heartaches and let go of the things that cause us stress. While we try to move on and forget everything that reminds us of the past, the process has never been easy. After all, the art of letting go is not without challenges.

There’s nothing wrong with being hurt when people do things that are, well, hurtful. However, it doesn’t mean that we should just sit idly and suffer. It is also an undisputed fact that we feel greater distress when the offense comes from the people we trust. If you want to move forward and reclaim your sense of peace, this article offers some tips.

Distancing

It is good to distance yourself from people or things that cause us pain. If you’re in a relationship with someone and they do things that hurt your feelings, walking away from the toxic relationship is the best step. The mistake most people make is that they get blinded with love, and they find it difficult to let go. However, the more we see them, the more we want them back in our life. This is why distancing ourselves from whatever causes us pain is a great way of letting go of things that hurts us. Always remember that in most cases, out of sight is out of mind.

Be thankful

Be thankful for what happened and don’t get stuck with the question of why it is happening to you. Talk to yourself whenever you get hurt and find out why it’s good for you to be apart from that thing. Whether it’s heartbreaks from your partner, see the good reason why you had to leave and don’t keep on reminiscing on why it must happen.

Focus more on yourself

focus on yourself

Focus more on yourself rather than thinking about the past. Find something you love doing and get attached to it, find your purpose, and don’t worry about the stressor. When you’re addicted to what you love doing, you spend time doing it and you forget whatever might be hurting you.

Focus on the present

Practice focusing on the present and not the past. The more you learn to live in the present and not the past, the more you’d be stronger in life. Accept the fact that whatever had happened in the past can’t be changed, but the present can be worked on just to get a brighter future. Holding onto the past will do nothing but steal your present and shatter the future.

Understand the situation

Understanding that the person or thing causing stress was never meant to be yours (maybe you just lost something precious, or someone you ever loved so dearly just broke up with you). Believe that the very best will come your way with ease; if it were ever meant for you, it wouldn’t cause you pain and stress.

Don’t complicate issues

Be gentle with yourself in the process of letting go if you haven’t been through it before. You need to understand that it takes time to heal from your pain. Don’t rush it because it’s a step by step process. If you go hard on yourself, you’ll only get hurt even more.

Eliminate the stress indicator

Eliminate whatever reminds you of the bad experience or stress you are going through—eliminating works when the stress indicator is something materialistic, human or emotional. Take out whatever reminds you of bad moments that cause stress pending the time you get over the stress.

Make friends

letting go of stress

Don’t be afraid to make new friends. Friends, especially the real ones, have a way of cheering us up whenever we’re down. Your friend can help you get over stress by taking you out for brunch or dinner: you laugh together and get a nice time out. It is an undisputed fact that stress and emotional breakdown always want to make one distant himself/ herself from the social world. However, the best you can do for yourself is to make new friends. The good times spent with friends have a way of relieving pains.

Move on

Don’t expect apologies if what is causing you stress is human. Sometimes we get to hurt ourselves more with expectations. When people hurt us, we wait for them to apologize. Expecting apologies and not getting it makes you feel worse.

The takeaway

Whenever you are stressed or troubled, don’t give in to the pain. Your peace of mind should be the priority. Always remember you need to be stronger than ever and never let anyone/anything be in control of your emotions and happiness. You are the perfect person to handle stress and emotional pains.

The post How To Let Go Of Things That Cause You Stress appeared first on Dumb Little Man.

Lin-Manuel Miranda burns John Bolton for that ‘Hamilton’-inspired book title in freestyle rap

Lin-Manuel Miranda burns John Bolton for that 'Hamilton'-inspired book title in freestyle rap

With the filmed original cast performance of Hamilton hitting Disney+ next week, creator and star Lin-Manuel Miranda returned to the Tonight Show for the first time since Jimmy Fallon’s first at-home show in March. Miranda, who also happens to have a documentary about his improv show Freestyle Love Supreme coming out next month, was game for a game called Random Object Freestyle.

Fallon held up a number of not especially random, suspiciously topical objects — including a Hamilton poster, a Broadway street sign, a box of popcorn, and a face mask — for Miranda to riff on lyrically. He didn’t bat an eye until Fallon revealed a copy of former national security advisor John Bolton’s tell-all Trump White House memoir, whose title happens to be a Hamilton reference.  Read more…

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AI researchers condemn predictive crime software, citing racial bias and flawed methods

A collective of more than 1,000 researchers, academics and experts in artificial intelligence are speaking out against soon-to-be-published research claims to use neural networks to “predict criminality.” At the time of writing, more than 50 employees working on AI at companies like Facebook, Google and Microsoft had signed on to an open letter opposing the research and imploring its publisher to reconsider.

The controversial research is set to be highlighted in an upcoming book series by Springer, the publisher of Nature. Its authors make the alarming claim that their automated facial recognition software can predict if a person will become a criminal, citing the utility of such work in law enforcement applications for predictive policing.

“By automating the identification of potential threats without bias, our aim is to produce tools for crime prevention, law enforcement, and military applications that are less impacted by implicit biases and emotional responses,” Harrisburg University Professor and co-author Nathaniel J.S. Ashby said.

The research’s other authors include Harrisburg University Assistant Professor Roozbeh Sadeghian and Jonathan W. Korn, a Ph.D. student highlighted as an NYPD veteran in a press release. Korn lauded software capable of anticipating criminality as “a significant advantage for law enforcement agencies.”

In the open letter opposing the research’s publication, AI experts expressed “grave concerns” over the study and urged Springer’s review committee to withdraw its offer. The letter also called on other publishers to decline to publish similar future research, citing a litany of reasons why both facial recognition and crime prediction technology should be approached with extreme caution and not leveraged against already vulnerable communities.

The publication’s opponents don’t just worry that the researchers have opened an ethical can of worms—they also cast doubt on the research itself, criticizing “unsound scientific premises, research, and methods, which numerous studies spanning our respective disciplines have debunked over the years.”

Facial recognition algorithms have long been criticized for poor performance in identifying non-white faces, among many other scientific and ethical concerns frequently raised about this kind of software. Given that the research in question developed facial recognition software that can be applied for predictive policing purposes, the technology’s stakes couldn’t be higher.

“Machine learning programs are not neutral; research agendas and the data sets they work with often inherit dominant cultural beliefs about the world,” the letter’s authors warn.

“The uncritical acceptance of default assumptions inevitably leads to discriminatory design in algorithmic systems, reproducing ideas which normalize social hierarchies and legitimize violence against marginalized groups.”