Day: August 12, 2020

How Adult Daycare Is Fighting The Loneliness Problem

Would it surprise you to learn that chronic loneliness can decrease your lifespan as much as 26%? That works out to two decades less to live your life, which is a bigger decrease than alcoholism or obesity. This is a uniquely western problem — success is measured in the ability to afford to live alone or as a nuclear family, which is actually worse for our health in the long run. There is a real and measurable deleterious effect on health and life expectancy from loneliness, and that also results in higher healthcare and end of life care costs in the long run.

The American Loneliness Problem

In 2018, 54% of Americans said they felt lonely all or some of the time. By 2019 that figure had risen to 61%. These people often report that no one around them shares their interests, that no one really knows them very well, or that no one respects their abilities.

By generation, the younger generations are by far the loneliest. GenZ, Millennials, and GenX are the most lonely generations overall, but loneliness has more dire consequences for the older generations. 18% of suicide deaths are senior citizens, the highest percentage for any age group

77% of those who feel lonely say they lack a social support system. People need friends and neighbors they can depend on for help when they need it, advice they consider trustworthy, and someone to share activities with them.

Unfortunately the American ideal of success often works against this. The cost of living is high, but expectations for a big house, a small family, and two cars is at an all-time high. There are fewer people living in larger houses that necessitate more income, which means less time to spend together as a family, let alone with friends. Multigenerational homes where families would share expenses and be in closer quarters are seen as a failure.

How Health Impacts Loneliness

adult daycare is fighting the loneliness problem

People who have health conditions, physical disabilities, mental illness, and others are more prone to becoming lonely. These conditions already make it more challenging to maintain friendships, and they can often complicate even the simplest act of getting out of the house to enjoy an activity.

There is a 374% higher instance of both depression and psychological distress among people who are in poor health, and people who are lonely are 278% more likely to have chronic health problems. It’s difficult to tell which is causing which, but the correlation is far too strong to ignore.

People with substance abuse problems, chronic physical illnesses, and dementia or Alzheimer’s are more likely to feel lonely. What’s more, people who feel lonely are more likely to develop diabetes, heart disease, and substance abuse disorders.

Physically, loneliness leads to an increase in norepinephrine levels which can cause spikes in white blood cell counts that leads to inflammation. This can also decrease immunity, leading to still more health problems.

In seniors, increased loneliness can increase the risk of death by 14%.

Adult Daycare To The Rescue

adult daycare

In many communities, community centers provide seniors with access to daytime care. These are places where people can get meals, meet new friends and socialize, have opportunities for exercise that meets their physical needs, and more.

Staving off loneliness can add years to life and life to years. It also has a measurable impact on healthcare and end of life care spending. People who attend adult daycare facilities experience fewer ER visits and hospital admissions, and when they do have to be admitted to the hospital they spend less time there on average. For dementia patients, attending adult daycare staves off cognitive decline.

After a stroke, patients are likely to suffer greater loneliness and feelings they can’t participate in activities like they used to. Unfortunately when patients give into this loneliness it can result in a greater risk of depression and less ability to fully recover. People need others to help with their recovery, and adult daycare centers provide this to people who don’t have communities that can help them.

Loneliness costs us all in terms of health and healthcare costs. Providing seniors and those living with disabilities the opportunity to have their physical and social needs met prevents many preventable problems. Learn more about challenging the loneliness epidemic with adult daycare below.

Please include attribution to with this graphic.

The post How Adult Daycare Is Fighting The Loneliness Problem appeared first on Dumb Little Man.

Watch Sarah Cooper and her iconic Trump impression guest host ‘Jimmy Kimmel Live’

Watch Sarah Cooper and her iconic Trump impression guest host 'Jimmy Kimmel Live'

2020 has been weird for everybody, but Sarah Cooper, the latest comedian to guest host Jimmy Kimmel Live, has definitely not had a normal one.

“This year has been insane,” she said, before correcting herself: “I’m sorry. That’s offensive. This year has been presidential

“I started this year doing a late night set at a pizza place in Jersey City. Now here I am hosting a late night show in a vacant house. Actually, the number of people in the audience is exactly the same.”

Cooper shot to fame this year thanks to her pitch-perfect, expressive lipsyncing of Trump’s rambling public statements. So as much as she’s clearly not a fan of the president, she has to admit that his unhinged tenure has been good for her, personally, in one specific way. Read more…

More about Donald Trump, Jimmy Kimmel Live, Comedians, Culture, and Politics

Former COO sues Pinterest, accusing it of gender discrimination, retaliation and wrongful termination

Pinterest’s former chief operating officer has filed a lawsuit accusing the company of gender discrimination. Françoise Brougher, who says she was abruptly fired from the company in April, is suing the company to hold it “accountable for discrimination, retaliation, and wrongful termination in violation of the Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA), and the Labor Code,” according to a Tuesday filing in San Francisco Superior Court. (The full text of the filing is embedded below.)

Pinterest said in June this year that it had about 400 million monthly active users, most of whom are women. But its top executives are all men. “Ironically, even though Pinterest markets itself to women as a source of lifestyle inspiration, the company leadership team is male dominated, and gender-biased attitudes are prevalent,” the lawsuit says.

Before joining Pinterest in March 2018, Brougher held executive positions at Square, Google and Charles Schawb. Brougher alleged in her lawsuit that she was hired with a less favorable equity compensation package than her male peers. She claimed that she was also left out of key decision-making by other executives; was subjected to a hostile work environment; and ultimately fired by chief executive officer Ben Silbermann when she spoke up against her treatment.

In a Medium post published today, Brougher wrote, “I have always been a private person, but I am opening up about my experience because if someone of my privilege and seniority is fired for speaking out about these issues, the situation is likely far worse for people earlier in their careers.”

Brougher’s case against Pinterest comes two months after two Black former employees, Ifeoma Ozoma and Aerica Shimizu Banks, accused the company of unequal pay, racial discrimination and retaliation.

At the time Brougher was hired, the lawsuit says she was told Pinterest’s board directed executives to receive backloaded equity grants. Her equity grant stipulated that only 10% of shares vested in the first year; followed by 20% the second year; 30% the third year; and 40% the fourth year. Brougher assumed this vesting schedule was standard for Pinterest executives.

When the company filed to go public last year, however, Brougher realized while looking at its S-1 filing that her male peers’ equity grants were not backloaded. Brougher’s compensation was adjusted after she raised concerns with Silbermann, who directed her to Pinterest’s human resources department.

Brougher says she was not invited on Pinterest’s IPO roadshow, despite being its COO and knowing many of the company’s investors.

After Pinterest’s initial public offering in April 2019, Brougher says she was no longer invited to board meetings, even though members of her team occasionally were — sometimes without her knowledge. “As COO of Pinterest, Ms. Brougher no longer had meaningful engagement with the company’s board,” the lawsuit says.

“The abrasiveness trap”

Brougher’s suit also claims that she began receiving more critical feedback, and cites a study by tech executive Kiernan Snyder called “The Abrasiveness Trap,” which found women are assessed more negatively than men in 248 reviews collected from 28 companies of different sizes. Snyder found that 87.9% of reviews for women contained critical feedback, compared to 58.9% of reviews for men. Their personalities were the focus of criticism in 75.5% of critical reviews for women, compared to just 2.4% of the critical reviews received by men.

The lawsuit says Silbermann criticized Brougher for “not being collaborative and told her that she did not have consistently healthy cross-functional relationships.” When Brougher asked him for more details, she claims “he told her to keep quiet, saying she should ‘be mindful’ of how she acted in a group setting.”

Pinterest’s chief financial officer Todd Morgenfeld also allegedly became “increasingly disrespectful” to Brougher beginning in January 2020, undermining her authority by ignoring her and talking directly to her team members.

In one meeting, Brougher says Morgenfeld sarcastically asked “What is your job anyway?” Silbermann would also wait to make key strategy decisions after meetings Brougher attended, meeting with one or two male colleagues after she had left.

In February, the lawsuit says Brougher received a peer review written by Morgenfeld, even though she had not been asked to review him. Despite Brougher’s work on Pinterest’s IPO, advertiser base and monetization strategy in Europe, the lawsuit says the “Morgenfeld’s only comment on her 2019 achievements was: “Seems to be a champion for diversity issues.”

During a video call with Morgenfeld on February 21, 2020, Brougher says she tried to address his feedback, but that he became angry during the call, raised his voice, called her a liar, and questioned the value she brought to Pinterest before hanging up on her.

After the call, Brougher says she texted Silbermann and told him it had not gone well. On February 24, she met with Pinterest’s Chief Human Resources Officer Jo Dennis and said she wanted to find a way to work with Morgenfeld, but was uncomfortable meeting alone with him. Instead of mediating between Brougher and Morgenfeld, the lawsuit alleges Dennis treated the matter as a possible legal issue, escalating it to Pinterest’s in-house counsel.

On the same day, Brougher also met with Silbermann. The lawsuit says that Silbermann compared the situation between Morgenfeld and Brougher to “an old couple fighting over who would make coffee.”

Then on April 2, Silbermann told Brougher that she was being fired and told her to transfer her responsibilities to Morgenfeld over the next month. He also asked her to tell her team that she had made the decision to leave, which she refused to do. Brougher claims her termination cost her “tens of millions of dollars in lost earnings and equity compensation.”

Brougher is being represented by law firm Rudy, Exelrod, Zieff & Lowe, which also represented Ellen Pao in her gender discrimination lawsuit against Kleiner Perkins.

TechCrunch has reached out to Pinterest for comment. In a statement to The New York Times, a Pinterest representative said the company is conducting an independent review of its culture, policies, and practices.

BROUGHER_VS_PINTEREST.pdf by TechCrunch on Scribd