Day: October 1, 2020

10 Biggest Moving Mistakes You’ll Want To Avoid

Moving can be a stressful time because there is an overwhelming amount of things that need to be done. You have to find a new place, pack up all your things, haul them, put them in your new home, arrange utilities, and more. It’s easy to forget something, and mistakes can be very costly.

For the best moving tips, we are sharing with you the most common mistakes people make when moving from one home to another.

Not Getting Estimates

avoiding moving mistakes

Unless you’re doing all of the moving yourself, getting estimates is essential. You want to call up several different moving companies in your area well before your move date. Ask them about truck sizes, how much they charge by the hour, how many people they send, insurance, and mileage. Ask if you can get a quote in writing before comparing multiple quotes from the moving companies. This will help ensure you get the best rate possible for your move.

Not Making a Moving Checklist

Many people think they can simply remember everything they have to do before their big move. However, it’s easy to forget small things. For example, did you remember to call the utility companies and tell them your move date? Did you pick up enough packing supplies? Do you remember which moving company offered which quote? As hectic as moving it, it’s easy to let things slip through the cracks. This is where a moving checklist comes in. It’ll group things you should do by importance and date to make sure you remember everything.

Ignoring Moving Insurance

No one ever wants anything to go wrong in their move, and many people consider moving insurance an expense they don’t need. However, this is something important to have. What if the movers accidentally dropped your antique mirror? Maybe a piece of furniture or expensive electronics didn’t make it to your home unscathed. Whatever happens, moving insurance can help cover the cost to replace it. In turn, you won’t be out this money on top of everything else.

Not Taking Measurements

You may assume that all of your furniture will fit smoothly through your doorways or up the stairs in your new home, but this can be a huge mistake. You could end up paying to move items that simply won’t fit into your new home. Before you move, go to your new home and measure the doorways and stairs. Take your measurements back and measure your larger pieces of furniture. Do they fit? If not, you may have to sell them off before you move.

Putting Your Valuables in the Moving Truck

Did you know that many moving companies refuse to deal with valuable items like jewelry? If it gets lost in the move, you could be out these pieces. This is why you want to carefully pack your valuables, label them, and transport them yourself. Expensive technology, collectibles, or important documents should also go with you in your vehicle where you or a family member can keep a close eye on them. Read your moving contract and see if the company can move things like firearms, grills, or alcohol.

Forgetting to Prep for the Pets

If you’re just moving across town, this won’t be as big of an issue. However, if you’re moving hours away, you want to prep for your pet. Make sure all of your pet’s shots are updated. Get any certificates, copies of medical records, and paperwork you need for your new vet. Your pet should have the proper tags and identification with them, and you’ll have to plan how to transport them. Ask about motion sickness medications and portable kennels for the ride.

No Personal Survival Kit

Everyone in the family should have a small personal survival kit to ensure the move goes as smoothly as possible. It could include must-have items like a screwdriver, address book, map, flashlight, toiletries, can opener, dog food, any item your child can’t sleep without, coffee, soap, toilet paper, medications, and cash. This kit will get you through the first few hours of the move before you have a chance to unpack. It should go in the car with you and be ready to grab when you get to the house.

Failing to Switch Important Addresses

Credit card bureaus, insurance agencies, banks, fitness centers, utilities, and subscription-based services are entities you’ll have to contact to switch your address. Forward your mail at the post office. Talk to your primary care doctor and get referrals to a new clinic and arrange to have your records transferred over. Get veterinarian paperwork and school records together and make sure you change your voting address before the next election.

Not Leaving Time to Clean

You don’t want to neglect your current home in favor of your new one. You should set aside time to deep clean your old home and make any repairs necessary to get it ready for the next buyers or tenants. Get any deposits back and cancel any services you have like lawn care. Call your local utility company and give them your move date to transfer it over. You may have to pay off any bills at this time.

Not Labeling the Boxes

moving mistakes to avoid

You want to clearly label all of your moving boxes and organize them by room. This will remove a lot of the stress and guesswork that comes with unpacking. It’ll also help the movers put your boxes in the correct space in your new home. Label the room, what’s in the box, and any special instructions for the movers on the side or top of the box.

BONUS: Trying to Do Everything Yourself

Moving is superlatively taxing emotionally and physically. Get your family members or friends you are moving with involved in the whole process by delegating tasks. For example, the kids can take care of pets or fragile electronic items. They can also be tasked with categorizing items and labeling boxes. By sharing these tasks, you can focus on getting everything done.

Use These 10 Best Moving Tips for Moving Success

While it’s true that no one likes to move, these 10 best moving tips can help ensure the process is as stress-free as possible. You should start preparing for your move well in advance to give yourself time to pack and organize everything. If you do, you’ll be able to enjoy your new home sooner and relax.

The post 10 Biggest Moving Mistakes You’ll Want To Avoid appeared first on Dumb Little Man.

BTS danced their feelings out in an adorably dorky game

BTS danced their feelings out in an adorably dorky game

K-pop phenomenon BTS has been absolutely dominating the charts, shattering records with their bubbly English-language hit “Dynamite.” Yet behind their slick stage performances the Bangtan Boys are just a group of seven dorky, adorable goofballs — a side they got to show off in a game of Dance Your Feelings on The Tonight Show.

RM, Jin, Suga, J-Hope, Jimin, V, and Jungkook joined Jimmy Fallon in attempting to convey various feelings and situations through dance, ranging from joy to surprise to “your jacket getting stuck in the car door.” There was also quite a bit of screaming, with Jin unable to contain his feelings about “watching Netflix for 5 hours and getting a dead leg.” Read more…

More about The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon, K Pop, Jimmy Fallon, Bts, and Bangtan Boys

Allbirds CEO Joey Zwillinger on the startup’s $100 million round, profitability, and SPAC mania

As people spend less time out in the world and more time daydreaming about when a vaccine will arrive, lifestyle shoes are only gaining traction.

One obvious beneficiary is Allbirds, the San Francisco-based maker of comfortable, sustainable kicks that launched in 2016 and quickly became a favorite in Silicon Valley circles before taking off elsewhere.

Though the company saw its business slow this year because of the pandemic, its products are now available to purchase in 35 countries and its 20 brick-and-mortar stores are sprinkled throughout the U.S. and Europe, with another outpost in Tokyo and several shops in China.

Investors clearly see room for more growth. Allbirds just closed on $100 million in Series E funding at roughly the same $1.6 billion valuation it was assigned after closing on $27 million in Series D funding earlier this year, and blank-check companies have been calling, says cofounder and CEO Joey Zwillinger. He talked with us earlier this week in a chat that has been edited for length and clarity.

TC: Your shoes are sold worldwide. What are your biggest markets?

JZ: The biggest market by far is the U.S., and the same day that we started here in 2016, we also launched in New Zealand, so that’s been very good to us over the last four years, too. But we’ve seen growth in Japan and Korea and China and Canada and Australia. We have a network of warehouses globally that lets us reach 2.5 billion people [who], if they were so inclined, could get their product in three days. We’re proud of the infrastructure we’ve set up.

TC: We’ve all worn shoes a lot less than we might have expected in 2020. How has that impacted your business?

JZ: We’re growing but definitely not at the same pace we would be had the pandemic not occurred. We’re predominantly digital in terms of how we reach people, but stores are important for us. And we had to switch [those] off completely and lost a portion of our sales for a long time.

TC: Did you have to lay off your retail employees?

JZ: A large portion of our retail force was unable to work, but we were luckily able to keep them fully paid for four months, plus [some received] government benefits if they got that. And now all of our 20 stores are up and running again in a way that’s totally safe and everyone feels really comfortable.

We also donated shoes to frontline workers — 10,000 pairs or around a million dollars’ worth.

TC: What does Allbirds have up its sleeve, in terms of new offerings?

JZ: We just launched our native mobile app, and through it we’re able to give our more loyal fans exclusives. It’s a really cool experience that blends technology with fashion. You can try on shoes in a virtual mirror; you’re given information [about different looks] that you wouldn’t have otherwise.

We also launched wool-based weather-proofed running shoes in April that have blown away our expectations but [were fast discovered by] people who haven’t really been running for 10 to 15 years and are running again [because of gym closures]. It’s a super high-stakes category and one that’s hard to break into because people buy on repeat. But we spent two years making it. It’s not like we launched it because of the pandemic. It’s a shoe for 5K to 10K distances — it’s not a marathon shoe or a trail shoe — and that we’ve been able to clearly articulate that speaks to its success, I think.

TC: What about clothing?

We launched underwear and socks last year in a small launch. We developed a textile that hasn’t been used before — it’s a blend of tree fiber and merino wool because our view is that nature can unlock magic. Underwear is typically synthetic — it’s made from plastics — or cotton, which isn’t a great material for a whole bunch of reasons. [Meanwhile] ours is phenomenal for temperature control; it also feels like cashmere.

TC: Patagonia really advertises its social and environmental values. Do you see Allbirds evolving in a similar way, with a growing spate of offerings?

JZ: I’m incredibly humbled by [the comparison]. Given their environmental stewardship of the retail sector, we hope we’re compared to them. But they are much more of an outdoor brand — not a competitor so to speak. And we’d love to share more of the retail world with them so we can do our environmental thing together.

TC: You just raised funding. Are you profitable and, if not, is profitability in sight?

JZ: We’ve been profitable for most of our existence. Having some discipline as we grow is good. We’re not close to the profitability that we’ll eventually have, but we’re still a small company in investment mode. After we emerge from the pandemic, we’ll enter a ramping-up phase.

TC: Everyone and their brother is raising money for a blank-check company, or SPAC, which can make it a lot faster for a private company to go public. Have you been approached, and might this option interest you?

JZ: Yes and no. Yes we’ve been approached, and no, we’re [not interested]. We want to build a great company and being public might be something that helps enable that for a whole bunch of reasons. But we want to do it at the right time, in a way that helps the business grow in the most durable and sustainable fashion. Just jumping at the opportunity of a SPAC without doing the rigorous prep the way we want to, we’re not super focused on that