Day: October 13, 2020

11 Tips For Truly Memorable And Unforgettable Gifts

How do you give someone an unforgettable gift? We all have that one person on our list who seems impossible to buy for, but you want to give them something memorable and hopefully even useful. Many people think this is easier said than done, but there are actually several things you can do to make your gift really count. We’ll outline several ways that you can try at your next gift-giving event.

Connect to Hobbies

memorable gifts

Connect your next gift to the recipient’s hobbies. If they love their job and going to work, get a gift related to their job.

Maybe they’re a classic film buff, hunting enthusiast, season-pass holder for local games, or they love to crochet. Find a funny t-shirt, a glossy coffee book related to their line of work, or an accessory they can use with their hobby. They’ll think if you every time they pull it out.

Evoke a Fond Memory

Bring back a fun shared memory with your gift recipient. If it’s for your significant other, it could be something more high-end, like a trip back to a special place you stayed when your relationship was new. For long-time friends, maybe it’s a shared guilty pleasure from when you were younger, like a favorite food, restaurant, dessert, trip, or movie theater. You could even get a group of friends in on it if they shared in the experience.

Customize It

There are dozens of things you can customize via embroidery, engraving, or embossing. You can customize aprons, bibles, whiskey barrels, shirts, bookmarks and even bottle openers. You can even get a nice photo of your giftee and have it printed onto your present just like these crystal sets from ArtPix3D.

Just make sure that whatever you decide on fits the recipient’s personality or interests so that if they’re the type of things to be used, they will be used frequently. And, if they’re the ornamental type, then your gift would be proudly displayed prominently in the den or living room and become a conversation piece for visiting friends and family.

Gift Experiences

memorable and unforgettable gifts

A traditional gift is one thing, but gifting someone an experience is a great way to form a solid connection. It also gives you something to remember and talk about for years to come. Maybe it’s concert tickets to a favorite band, a reservation at a hard-to-book restaurant, or a zoo pass for a year. Think about what your recipient likes and find an experience to match. This is even better if you don’t know the person super well because there is a good chance that they’ll be satisfied with whatever you give them.

Donate to a Cause They Support in Their Name

Did you know that giving gifts to a charity in your friend’s name has links to happiness? You could wait and gift in your friend or family member’s name around the holidays to someone in need. If they have a charity they support, make a donation, and put your friend’s name on it. Many times, the charities will send a short thank you note that you can give to your gift recipient.

Put Together a Gift Basket

Putting together a well-thought-out gift basket is a hybrid of giving a traditional gift and an experience. You want to create a collection of things the person likes to give them an experience. Say you have a music enthusiast in your life. Instead of going with a CD or vinyl as many traditionally would, go digital. Get a basket and some wine glasses. Add their favorite bottle of wine, earbuds, a Symphony chocolate bar, and other fun items like a soft throw blanket or scented candles. You could also toss in a Spotify or iTunes gift card.

DIY It

diy gifts

Food items count as DIY gifts. Everyone loves getting festive baked items, a mouth-watering dessert, or a home-cooked meal. There are literally millions of tutorials on YouTube and around the internet for DIY wall decor, t-shirts, coasters, candles, bath bombs, lotions, scrubs, beard oil, succulent planters, and more. Get creative and give an unforgettable gift that is personalized and practical.

Gift Time

This one may seem odd, but it can come in handy with close friends. Offer to walk the dog if your recipient is a pet owner or pet sit. Read to your grandparents or offer to babysit your friend’s kid(s) so they can take a night out and relax. You could make them coupons and slip it into a card to give to them. They can redeem it whenever they want. You could even add a few certificates if you have time on your hands.

Fill the Gift with Memories

unforgettable gifts

You can easily take great memories and turn it into a gorgeous gift. If they like crossword puzzles, make a few customized ones with memory-related answers. You could put together a well-curated photo album, or you could make a jar of memorabilia you’ve slowly collected over the years. As long as you make it meaningful, your recipient will cherish it for years to come.

Take Time to Present It

There are dozens of channels on YouTube dedicated to watching people unwrap things. Wrapping things and creating a lovely presentation makes the gift so much more thoughtful than it would be if you tossed it into a gift bag with a few pieces of tissue paper. It shows the person that you really care about their gift and them.

Gift Your Skills

gift of skills

There are at least one or two things you’re good at. Maybe you create graphics, sew, crochet, write, or paint. Maybe your skills lean more toward things like car detailing, baking, cooking, or translating. Whatever your skills are, you can turn them into a thoughtful gift. Offer to bake or cook something. If you’re fluent in another language, offer lessons.

Bottom Line

These unforgettable gift ideas are perfect for that person you have trouble gifting in your life. Try one or try a few and see the reaction you get. The recipient will love it, and you’ll get the knowledge that you’ve finally nailed down exactly how to gift them with something they will treasure for years to come.

The post 11 Tips For Truly Memorable And Unforgettable Gifts appeared first on Dumb Little Man.

The best Nintendo Switch bundle deals for Prime Day 2020

The best Nintendo Switch bundle deals for Prime Day 2020

TL;DR: There are lots of Nintendo Switch bundle deals available until midnight on Oct. 14 this Prime Day.


Experienced Prime Day and Black Friday shoppers will know that certain items always steal the show during these major events. In recent years, things like 4K TVs and laptops have had their moment in the spotlight, but nothing comes close to the Nintendo Switch. 

This console is still incredibly popular, and whenever deals start the drop, there always seems to be a rush for gamers to get their hands on the goods. Well, we have some good news, because Nintendo Switch bundles are on sale this Prime Day. Read more…

More about Nintendo Switch, Mashable Shopping, Shopping Uk, Uk Deals, and Prime Day

Why are VCs launching SPACs? Amish Jani of FirstMark shares his firm’s rationale

It’s happening slowly but surely. With every passing week, more venture firms are beginning to announce SPACs. The veritable blitz of SPACs formed by investor Chamath Palihapitiya notwithstanding, we’ve now seen a SPAC (or plans for a SPAC) revealed by Ribbit Capital, Lux Capital, the travel-focused venture firm Thayer Ventures, Tusk Ventures’s founder Bradley Tusk, the SoftBank Vision Fund, and FirstMark Capital, among others. Indeed, while many firms say they’re still in the information-gathering phase of what could become a sweeping new trend, others are diving in headfirst.

To better understand what’s happening out there, we talked on Friday with Amish Jani, the cofounder of FirstMark Capital in New York and the president of a new $360 million tech-focused blank-check company organized by Jani and his partner, Rick Heitzmann. We wanted to know why a venture firm that has historically focused on early-stage, privately held companies would be interested in public market investing, how Jani and Heitzmann will manage the regulatory requirements, and whether the firm may encounter conflicts of interest, among other things.

If you’re curious about starting a SPAC or investing in one or just want to understand how they relate to venture firms, we hope it’s useful reading. Our chat has been edited for length and clarity.

TC: Why SPACs right now? Is it fair to say it’s a shortcut to a hot public market, in a time when no one quite knows when the markets could shift?

AJ: There are a couple of different threads that are coming together. I think the first one is the the possibility that [SPACs] works and really well. [Our portfolio company] DraftKings [reverse-merged into a SPAC] and did a [private investment in public equity deal]; it was a fairly complicated transaction and they used this to go public and the stock has done incredibly well.

In parallel, [privately held companies] over the last five or six years could raise large sums of capital, and that was pushing out the the timeline [to going public] fairly substantially. [Now there are] tens of billions of dollars in value sitting in the private markets and [at the same time] an opportunity to go public and build trust with public shareholders and leverage the early tailwinds of growth.

TC: DraftKings was valued at $3 billion when it came out and it’s now valued at $17 billion, so it has performed really, really well. What makes an ideal target for a SPAC versus a traditional IPO? Does having a consumer-facing business help get public market investors excited? That seems the case.

AJ: It comes down to the nature and the growth characteristics and the sustainability of the business. The early businesses that are going out, as you point out, tend to be consumer based, but I think there’s as good an opportunity for enterprise software companies to use the SPAC to go public.

SPAC [targets] are very similar to what you would want in a traditional IPO: companies with large markets, extremely strong management teams, operating profiles that are attractive, and long term margin profiles that are sustainable, and to be able to articulate [all of that] and have the governance and infrastructure to operate in a public context. You need to be able to do that across any of these products that you use to get public.

TC: DraftKings CEO Jason Robins is an advisor on your SPAC. Why jump into sponsoring one of these yourselves?

AJ: When he was initially approached, we were, like most folks, pretty skeptical. But as the conversations evolved, and we began to understand the amount of customization and flexibility [a SPAC can offer], it felt very familiar. [Also] the whole point of backing entrepreneurs is they do things differently. They’re disruptive, they like to try different formats, and really innovate, and when we saw through the SPAC and the [actual merger] this complex transaction where you’re going through an M&A and raising capital alongside that and it’s all happening between an entrepreneur and a trusted partner, and they’ve coming to terms before even having to talk about all of these things very publicly, that felt like a really interesting avenue to create innovation.

For us, we’re lead partners and directors in the companies that we’re involved with; we start at the early stages at the seed [round] and Series A and work with these entrepreneurs for over a decade, and if we can step in with this product and innovate on behalf of our entrepreneurs and entrepreneurs in tech more broadly, we think there’s a really great opportunity to push forward the process for how companies get public.

TC: You raised $360 million for your SPAC. Who are its investors? Are the same institutional investors who invest in your venture fund? Are these hedge funds that are looking to deploy money and also potentially get their money out faster?

AJ: I think a bit of a misconception is this idea that most investors in the public markets want to be hot money or fast money. You know, there are a lot of investors that are interested in being part of a company’s journey and who’ve been frustrated because they’ve been frozen out of being able to access these companies as they’ve stayed private longe. So our investors are some are our [limited partners], but the vast majority are long-only funds, alternative investment managers, and people who are really excited about technology asa long term disrupter and want to be aligned with this next generation of iconic companies.

TC: How big a transaction are you looking to make with what you’ve raised?

AJ: The targets that we’re looking for are going to look very similar to the kind of dilution that a great company would take going public —  think of that 15%, plus or minus, around that envelope. As you do the math on that, you’re looking at a company that’s somewhere around $3 billion in value.  We’re going to have conversations with a lot of different folks who we know well, but that’s that’s generally what we’re looking for.

TC: Can you talk about your “promote,” meaning how the economics are going to work for your team?

AJ: Ours [terms] are very standard to the typical SPAC. We have 20% of the original founders shares. And that’s a very traditional structure as you think about venture funds and private equity firms and hedge funds: 20% is is very typical.

TC: It sounds like your SPAC might be one in a series.

AJ: Well, one step at a time. The job is to do this really well and focus on this task. And then we’ll see based on the reaction that we’re getting as we talk to targets and how the world evolves whether we do a second or third one.

TC: How involved would you be with the management of the merged company and if the answer is very, does that limit the number of companies that might want to reverse-merge into your SPAC?

AJ: The management teams of the companies that we will target will continue to run their businesses. When we talk about active involvement, it’s very much consistent with how we operate as a venture firm, [meaning] we’re a strong partner to the entrepreneur, we are a sounding board, we help them accelerate their businesses, we give them access to resources, and we leverage the FirstMark platform. When you go through the [merger], you look at what the existing board looks like, you look at our board and what we bring to bear there, and then you decide what makes the most sense going forward. And I think that’s going to be the approach that we take.

TC: Chamath Palihapitiya tweeted yesterday about a day when there could be so many VCs with SPACs that two board members from the same portfolio company might approach it to take it public. Does that sound like a plausible scenario and if so, what would you do?

AJ: That’s a really provocative and interesting idea and you could take that further and say, maybe they’ll form a syndicate of SPACs. The way I think about it is that competition is a good thing. It’s a great thing for entrepreneurship, it’s a good thing overall.

The market is actually really broad. I think there’s something like 700-plus private unicorns that are out there. And while there are a lot of headlines around the SPAC, if you think about technology-focused people with deep tech backgrounds, that pool gets very, very limited, very quickly. So we’re pretty excited about the ability to go have these conversations.

You can listen in on more of this conversation, including around liquidation issues and whether FirstMark will target its own portfolio companies or a broader group or targets, here.