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Crunch Report | CNN shuts down Casey Neistat’s Beme

Robinhood is going to let you buy and sell crypto soon, CNN shuts down Casey Neistat’s Beme and Sotheby’s acquires Thread Genius. All this on Crunch Report. Read More

Made from metal and driven by the wind, these sculptures resemble pulsing alien creatures

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Anthony Howe is a sculptor who doesn’t like static works of art. For the last 30 years, his material of choice has been metal, and his purpose: to make it come to life.

Howe has built hundreds of kinetic sculptures that he says were plucked straight from his imagination. Today, some are scattered across the world, while others are blending in with nature in his studio on Orcas Island, Washington. Read more…

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Collector finds treasure after developing hundreds of thousands of film negatives found in the trash

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Thomas Sauvin has spent nearly a decade trawling through film negatives people have thrown away.

The French photography collector buys photographic negatives that are destined for the scrapyard, and brings them back to his studio where he selects, classifies and digitises them.

He has so far developed 750,000 photos over the course of eight years.

Sauvin’s project first started in 2009 when he was travelling around China as a photography collector.

★ 北 ☆ 京 ★ 银 ☆ 矿 ★

A post shared by ★ Beijing Silvermine ☆ 北京银矿 ★ (@beijing_silvermine) on Read more…

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New startup lets you take out interest-free loans to buy art on the spot

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Ever been to an art exhibition, spied something you like, wanted to snap it up immediately, but didn’t have the coin? Don’t ask your bank, ask Art Money.

Launched in 2015, Australian startup Art Money is designed to help regular folks buy art on the spot in local galleries — and now it’s going worldwide. Started with a handful of Sydney galleries by 10 Group, Art Money is now available in 350 galleries worldwide, from Auckland to Singapore to New York. 

Art Money has sold more than 1,000 artworks through its interest-free loan program — and one quarter of customers were first-time art buyers. The team says they’ve seen more than $2 million spent in Sydney galleries with their program — and now, 90 percent of galleries in inner city Sydney offer Art Money. Read more…

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Chemist of Mysteries: Man Ray’s Dream Photos

Minimalist and modern-sounding, Man Ray is the sort of name that seems as if it should be outlined in buzzing neon. Born Emmanuel Radnitzky in Philadelphia on August 27, 1890, the photographer and visual artist shortened his nickname, “Manny,” to Man, and after 1912 went by a less Jewish-sounding version of his surname in response to the anti-Semitism of the times.

It was an inspired choice. Man Ray sounds like a shaft of light in human form—a radiant man. “I have freed myself from the sticky medium of paint and am working directly with light itself,” the frustrated painter exulted, after discovering the technique that enabled him to produce Rayographs, as he called them—spooky, one-of-a-kind images created by placing objects on light-sensitive paper and exposing them to light, producing white silhouettes that glow eerily against a black background, like ectoplasmic manifestations in a Spiritualist photograph. “Everything can be transformed, deformed, and obliterated by light,” he said. “Its flexibility is precisely the same as the suppleness of the brush.”

Ray’s work is collected in a new book, Man Ray (part of Taschen’s Photo Masters series). A fellow traveler of the Dadaists and Surrealists, Ray (1890-1976) pioneered unconventional techniques that, married to his visual wit, evoke hidden realities. “By assembling a vocabulary of seldom-used darkroom techniques, he freed photography from its reputation for recording the observable world and used it to create images drawn from the imagination,” writes Katherine Ware in her essay “Chemist of Mysteries,” included in the book. In his alien still lives, Calla lilies give off a radioactive glow (a special effect produced by solarization, in which a print or a negative is exposed during its development, causing some darks to appear light, some lights to appear dark). He had an offhanded brilliance when it came to titles. An eggbeater, lit so it casts a shadow and photographed from an awkward angle, takes on a life of its own, especially when titled La Femme (“The Woman”).  In “Le Violon d’Ingres” (“The Violin of Ingres”), a pair of f-holes, painted onto a photo of a naked woman with her back to us, turns a run-of-the-mill nude into a sly, Duchampian pun. But it’s his Rayographs of everyday detritus—bottles, combs, toy guns—that open the door to another world. Surrealist X-rays, they expose the unconscious lives of inanimate objects.

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Sydney Opera House will light up with Indigenous Australian art every sunset

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The sails of the Sydney Opera House are often a canvas for projections throughout the year, but now the icon is set to be a display for Indigenous Australian art every sunset.

It’s called Badu Gili, meaning “water light” in the language of the traditional owners of the land the building sits on, the Gadigal people. 

The projection will comprise of a seven-minute animation exploring ancient stories, and will begin its appearance on the sails from Wednesday evening at sunset.

Image: DANIEL BOUD Read more…

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Bright pink houses attract crowds looking for the perfect selfie, and the neighbors are pissed

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These houses in Los Angeles are so pink the entire internet seems to have noticed. Everything from the walkway to the hedges to the trash bins are bright pink.

It’s not a permanent look. The vacant LA homes are part of a large-scale art piece, and they’re being demolished to make way for a new housing complex

Neighbors are not pleased with the stunt and the “noise” they are attracting. Everyone wants to pose with the absurdly pink structures, as you can tell by browsing photos on Instagram tagged with #pinkhouses.

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This ethereum-based project could change how we think about digital art

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Someone owns this picture.

Image: Cryptopunk

No, not the copyright to the picture. They own the picture itself. You can, of course, download a version, but that’s just a copy. Someone owns the original. It is art, and it has an owner.

What does that mean in the digital age? That’s what the guys at Larva Labs want to find out.

The image above is just one of 10,000 pieces of art released last week as part of an experiment called CryptoPunks. What makes this project unique is that each image is tied to a piece of computer code on the blockchain-based Ethereum platform. That means the owner of each piece of art is clear—and that ownership can be transferred.  Read more…

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Artist's amazingly intricate cardboard creations will definitely make you smile

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These figurines are a far cry from your usual cardboard cut-outs. 

Monami Ohno, a Japanese artist, transforms plain brown cardboard into incredible objects. 

From Star Wars to Super Mario, there’s nothing she hasn’t done. 

5月4日は世界中でスターウォーズの日! Day of STAR WARS!4.5.2016 #StarWars #cardboard

A post shared by Monami Ohno (@monamincb) on

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This man makes amazing surreal animations from famous artwork

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Famous pieces of artwork are fun to look at, but it turns out they’re even more fun to animate.

Kajetan Obarski (a.k.aKiszkiloszki) is an Amsterdam-based animator who specialises in turning artistic masterpieces into spectacularly surreal short animations.

“I just collect objects, paintings, pictures from the public domain and then I create animations,” Obarski said. “I do my own photos and my own digital works for animations too.”

As you can see, the results are glorious:

Although Obarski began playing with animation software around 10 years ago, he only started putting his creations online last year. Read more…

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Zelda: Art & Artifacts is an enormous art book for Hyrule explorers

The Legend of Zelda: Art & Artifacts is a mammoth book containing art and errata from practically every Zelda title ever released. Having spent a mere afternoon with it, I feel I’ve experienced an adolescence-worth of missed gameplay.

I’ve never gotten around to immersing myself in the Zelda games, but was always struck by the their’ precision and economy, a world crafted more than built. There’s a mysticism, even a darkness to Zelda that seems out of place in Nintendo’s cutesy-poo lineup.

A heroic cycle, with a eternally-recurring hero and nemesis, every generation of the mythos is a strange echo of another, and the star is a stoic mute boy defined by his tools and under fate’s control. Hyrule and its hero are less standard RPG fantasy than a uniquely Japanese new wave murmur, an Elric in Arcadia who brings sunshine rather than storm and never has a single brooding thought and gets to live silently ever after.

Published by Dark Horse Books, it’s 424 pages long and weighs 6 pounds. It’s 12.3 x 9.3 inches long and wide and two inches thick. Notes and other documentation are translated by Aria Tanner, Hisashi Kotobuki, Heidl Plechl and Michael Gombos.

Organized roughly by release date (the canonical continuity seems rather murky), there’s early animation-style cels, box art, instruction booklets, and even some work from the latest title, Breath of the Wild, released a couple of weeks ago.

It goes from exquisitely painted concept art right down to detailed sprite sheets from classic 8-bit outings, and the print quality is outstanding. It’s heavy; you could flatten a cat with it.

I can tell that the selections are far from exhaustive, though: this is clearly an official Nintendo item made by and for people who like the word “franchise.” While it’s good and fair that atrocities such as the Philips-licensed CD-i Zelda games are not included, it also means no Katsuya Terada, for example, a brilliant artist whose Zelda work is among the best and the most off-brand going—but which thereby carries less nostalgia value for its audience, perhaps.

Beyond some fascinating interviews with the creators, there’s not much context, either; it’s a companion volume to the “Historia”, a similarly bulky book dealing with the world’s history in detail.

But I have to get it, now, as the art’s sucked me in, and I don’t have time to play 20 video games to understand what the Hyrule is going on.

PROS

• Big, beautiful book.

• Impeccable color reproduction.

• Unfussy page layouts that don’t crowd the art.

• Get shown a fantasy world, rather than told it.

• See an artistic formula evolve over 30 years

CONS

• Demands a prior interest in Zelda, will probably bore everyone else.

• Seriously, it’s mostly pictures of Link.

• Just making super clear here that there is a high “androgynous lads in green leather” noise floor here to contend with, if it’s not your thing.

The Legend of Zelda: Art & Artifacts [Dark Horse Books at Amazon]

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Makers: enter the Share Festival's ARTMAKER Prize competition for sincere electronic art

An all-star jury composed of Arduino inventor Massimo Canzi, Arthur C Clarke Center director Sheldon Brown, tech artist Motor Comino, activist Jasmina Tesanovic and OG Cyberpunk Bruce Sterling are judging the Artmaker prize for the tenth annual Share Festival: this year’s theme is “Sincerity” and the prize goes to “art works with the virtues of lucidity, honesty and clarity. Our theme for 2017 asks for self-evident truth and heartfelt emotion, and scorns all slyness, demagoguery and deceit.”
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Bavarian intelligence agency says Scientologists secretly took over one of the world's top art galleries

Bavaria’s Verfassungsschutz — “Federal Office for the Protection of the Constitution” — says that the Haus der Kunst, one of the world’s top contemporary art galleries, was infiltrated by Scientologists who rose through the ranks, illegally discriminated against non-Scientologists when hiring, and waged psychological warfare against staff who were not members of the cult.
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Ideal Boy, An: Charts from India

Cheap visual charts were the main educational aid in Indian classrooms until recently. Meant to teach children good behavior, and to assist their reading skills, these inexpensive posters were plastered everywhere by local printers. They have a naive art aesthetic since the artists were unschooled themselves. Generally the charts follow a formula of filing in a grid with examples. Like comic books, their garish colors and simple forms have their own innocent charm. This book rounds up a hundred samples of what is now a rare folk art.

Ideal Boy, An: Charts from India

by Sirish Rao, V. Geetha, Gita Wolf (Editors)

Dewi Lewis Publishing

2001, 120 pages, 6.9 x 1.0 x 9.4 inches, Hardcover

$7 Buy on Amazon

See other cool books at Wink.

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A traditional Japanese painting of Iron Man will look perfect in your grown up apartment

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Unlike a lot of fan art you’ve got hanging up on your wall, this one’s going to kick up the classiness a notch.

Behold Marvel’s Iron Man rendered in a Japanese ink-wash technique called sumi-e.

水墨画ぽい練習でアイアンマン pic.twitter.com/MsNuqlLUkM

— ikuyoan (@ikuyoan) February 16, 2017

Japanese artist Ikuyoan drew Iron Man using thick, dark lines of ink to frame the superhero.

You can watch Ikuyoan’s process as he draws Iron Man in a more modern, conventional form:

This isn’t the first time Iron Man has been drawn in sumi-e. Here’s another painting done in the same ink-wash that shows how gorgeous the style is: Read more…

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Artist fights street harassment through photos depicting Goddesses

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It’s ironic that men who worship female deities would harass women. But that’s exactly what one Malaysian artist is fighting against through a photo series depicting Hindu Goddesses. 

Ruby Subramaniam created the photo series in response to a Facebook group that was set up to threaten Hindu women with spray paint, should they be “inappropriately dressed” during Thaipusam. 

Thaipusam is a festival of devotion, where Hindus commemorate the occasion when the Hindu Goddess Parvati gives the Hindu God of war Murugan a spear, to vanquish an evil demon. The festival is celebrated in countries such as Malaysia, Singapore, South Africa and Sri Lanka on the full moon day of the Tamil month of Thai. Read more…

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The Bathgate Artifact Spinner: a beautiful, hand-machined fidget toy

Machinist/sculptor Chris Bathgate (previously) continues his foray into collaborations to make gorgeous, hand-machined fidget today (see: the slider; spinning tops, slider mark II): his latest is a “spinner,” made in collaboration with Mike Hogarty and Callye Keen from Revolvemakers.
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Selling original art from my graphic novel IN REAL LIFE to benefit ACLU and CAIR

Jen Wang, the incredible comics creator who adapted my award-winning story Anda’s Game for the bestselling graphic novel In Real Life is selling original, 9″ x 12″ art from the book, and the painting above these words, for $250 each — all proceeds divided equally between the American Civil Liberties Union and the Council on American Islamic Relations.
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The Glitoris is the shining beacon of pleasure we need

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People have been making penis art for an eternity, but finally one artist is giving the clitoris its due. 

Australian artist Alli Sebastian Wolf has created “The Glitoris,” which is exactly what it sounds like a: a giant, glittery clit. 

The striking work is a 100:1 scale model of one of humanity’s most elusive organs. Wolf crafted it from foam, lycra and sequins (which show where the clit’s 8,000 nerves run).

The result is hard to ignore, which Wolf told Mashable was part of the idea behind her work. 

“Almost no one I talk to knows about this incredible organ – how far it extends beyond what you can see on the surface and how it works,” she said. “I wanted to make something that celebrated it, a giant golden sparkling shrine that would help people come to love it like I do.” Read more…

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Yes, this detailed 3D-printed model was sculpted in VR, and it's just the start

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Getting people to believe that high-end virtual reality is truly immersive can be difficult if they haven’t tried devices like the Oculus Rift or HTC Vive first-hand. 

That gap of disbelief gets even wider when you try to convince the uninitiated that incredibly detailed, near retail-ready 3D-printed models are being born in VR, but this week we got our best example of exactly what’s possible. 

On Tuesday, Oculus character artist Giovanni Nakpil posted an amazingly detailed, 3D-printed model of an ogre modeled in Oculus Medium, the VR sculpting app, and then output via 3D printer.   Read more…

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