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So, turns out snakes have been hitchhiking on planes. Have a nice flight.

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Seems Snakes on a Plane isn’t as a ridiculous film as we thought, as new research suggests snakes have been hitchhiking on planes. Feel good about that trip you’re about to take? 

A team of scientists led by the University of Queensland has found that the brown tree snake, which has been obliterating Guam’s native bird population, made it to the Pacific island by hitchhiking on planes. 

And from Guam, they’re hitching it to Hawaii.

What planes? Don’t worry, the snakes didn’t just slither through security to a business class seat on a commercial flight. According to the study published in the Journal of Molecular Evolution, they hopped on military transport planes somewhere around Australia during World War II. Read more…

More about Snake, Birds, Snakes, Science, and Animals

New Zealand’s bird of the year is a highly cheeky parrot known for messing with humans

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New Zealand, you’re alright.

What other country, teeming with magnificent, yet sadly endangered wildlife, would have an annual bird of the year competition?

Perpetual natural paradise New Zealand has announced the winner for the country’s 13th bird of the year, awarded to the world’s only alpine parrot, the kea.

What’s a kea? It’s an unusual olive-green parrot found in the country’s southern alps, known for its intelligence, cheekiness, and curiosity — something that can “get them into trouble,” according to the BOTY website. Read more…

More about Bird, New Zealand, Endangered, Birds, and Endangered Species

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Bird staring at itself in this window is not having an existential crisis

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No, this bird isn’t having an existential crisis, despite appearances.

A bird in Queensland, Australia was photographed staring at itself in the window by journalist Nick Wiggins, with a sign above it.

“I’m a bush stone curlew. I’m fine. I just like to stare at myself in the window,” the sign reads, penned by “Caitlin from Wildcare Australia.” 

Of course, Twitter was happy to jump in with a collective “same.”

We’ve all been there pic.twitter.com/AKgnF9EoXb

— Nick Wiggins (@nick__w) March 13, 2017

Even with that logical explanation, it’s hard not to ignore the bird’s hilarious introspection, as it stares blankly at its own reflection — perhaps pondering at what’s become of its life. Read more…

More about Animals, Birds, Bird, Australia, and Watercooler

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Ornithologists are using drones to eavesdrop on songbirds

listening When conservationists put drones to work in field research, they typically function as flying eyes that gather imagery of the habitat and wildlife below. Now, ornithologists from Gettysburg College in Pennsylvania are using drones as flying ears to monitor songbirds in the Appalachian Mountains. Results of their drone study were published in the peer-reviewed journal The Auk:… Read More

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