deepfakes

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This deepfake of Robert Downey Jr. and Tom Holland in ‘Back to the Future’ is unreal

This deepfake of Robert Downey Jr. and Tom Holland in 'Back to the Future' is unreal

Out of all the faces to put on Doc Brown and Marty McFly in Back to the Future, I never knew how bad I needed it to be Robert Downey Jr. and Tom Holland.

This deepfake clip superimposes the faces of Downey Jr. and Holland over the original actors Christopher Lloyd and Michael J. Fox, giving us an incredibly convincing glimpse at what it would be like if the Avengers themselves rebooted the 1985 classic Back to the Future. YouTuber EZRyderX47 did a very good job with this one.

Given the two actors’ history as Iron Man and Spider-Man, and the pseudo-father-son dynamic that happened in the Marvel movies, this seems like it would be a great fit for Downey and Holland. Or we could just deepfake their faces into the entire movie. Read more…

More about Movies, Back To The Future, Deepfakes, Entertainment, and Movies Tv Shows

Reddit bests Facebook by rolling out a superior deepfakes policy

Reddit bests Facebook by rolling out a superior deepfakes policy

Reddit and Facebook are two very different social media platforms. As true as that may be, however, it’s difficult not to conclude “shots fired” with the timing of the former’s newest policy.

On Thursday, the popular social news site unveiled a brand new policy meant to curb impersonation and maliciously deceptive media on the platform. 

The new Reddit policy reads as follows:

Basically, Reddit is quashing lies and disinformation on the site. Users cannot try to legitimately pass off as another individual or entity. For example, a user cannot register the username of a celebrity and truly pretend to be that celebrity on the site. While that’s the most weaponized scenario, Reddit is also specific in pointing out forgery and fake articles, and links are covered under this policy too.  Read more…

More about Facebook, Reddit, Misinformation, Impersonation, and Deepfakes

WeChat restricts controversial video face-swapping app Zao, citing “security risks”

Zao went viral in China this weekend for its realistic face-swapping videos, but after controversy about its policies, WeChat restricted access to the app on its messaging platform.

Developed by a unit of Momo, one of China’s most popular dating apps, Zao creates videos that replace the faces of celebrities in scenes from popular movies, shows and music videos with a selfie uploaded by the user.

The app, currently available only in China, went viral as users shared their videos through WeChat and other social media platforms in China. But concerns about the potential misuse of deepfake technology coupled with a clause (now deleted) in Zao’s terms of use that gave it full ownership and copyright to content uploaded or created on it, in addition to “completely free, irrevocable, perpetual, transferrable, and re-licensable rights,” caused controversy.

In case you haven’t heard, #ZAO is a Chinese app which completely blew up since Friday. Best application of ‘Deepfake’-style AI facial replacement I’ve ever seen.

Here’s an example of me as DiCaprio (generated in under 8 secs from that one photo in the thumbnail) 🤯pic.twitter.com/1RpnJJ3wgT

— Allan Xia (@AllanXia) September 1, 2019

By going viral quickly and being very easy to use (Zao’s videos can be generated from a single selfie, though it suggests that users upload photos from several angles for better results), the app has also focused more attention on deepfake technology and how it can potentially be used to spread misinformation or harass people.

Users can still upload videos they created with Zao to WeChat, but if they try to download the app or send an invite link to another WeChat user, a message is displayed that says “this web page has been reported multiple times and contains security risks. To maintain a safe online environment, access to this page has been blocked.”23011567479434 .pic

Zao was released last Friday and quickly became the top free iOS app in China, according to App Annie. A statement posted on Sept. 1 to Zao’s Weibo account says “we completely understand everybody’s concerns about the privacy issue. We are aware of the issue and we are thinking about how to fix the problems, we need a little time.” Its terms and conditions now say user-generated content will only be used by the company to improve the app and that all deleted content will be removed from its servers.

TechCrunch has contacted Zao for comment.