Facebook Live

Auto Added by WPeMatico

Don't fall for these fake Facebook videos of Hurricane Irma, like millions of other people did

TwitterFacebook

More breaking news, and another score of fake videos and Facebook Lives, attracting tens of millions of views. 

The first example is this 30-second video which falsely claims to depict Hurricane Irma devastating the islands of Antigua and Barbuda in the Caribbean. 

The video, which was shared on Facebook by Hendry Moya Duran, attracted more than 27 million views and more than 789,000 shares. 

However, the footage he used is at least more than one year old, and it allegedly shows a tornado that hit Dolores, Uruguay, in May 2016, according to several comments on this YouTube video from that time.  Read more…

More about Science, Facebook Video, Facebook Live, Debunk, and Fake News

Powered by WPeMatico

Facebook struggles to prevent violence on Facebook Live

TwitterFacebook

Mark Zuckerberg has repeatedly said that live video is the future of Facebook, but what if that future is terrifying and full of violence?

What happens when one of the largest proponents of live video struggles to manage its darker side?

Reports that the sexual assault of a 15-year-old girl was broadcast on Facebook Live and watched by upwards of 40 people earlier this week have rightfully shocked many, and brought to mind a similarly disturbing incident from earlier in the year. 

Individuals posting about acts of violence on the social media platform is nothing new, but since the launch of Facebook Live, the company has faced a particularly difficult challenge: How to best respond to violence on the site when it’s happening in real time.  Read more…

More about Mark Zuckerberg, Violence Against Women, Violence, Streaming Video, and Facebook Live

Powered by WPeMatico

Legal action over boxing livestream highlights Facebook's piracy problem

Https%3a%2f%2fblueprint-api-production.s3.amazonaws.com%2fuploads%2fcard%2fimage%2f372371%2f70a43de1-8f12-4c86-b166-81a66acb3924

Feed-twFeed-fb

The presence of questionable content on Facebook Live is nothing new, but getting sued for it? That’s a little more unusual.

Two Australian men may be facing legal action after they streamed a highly anticipated boxing match on Facebook Live. To the chagrin of the cable television company Foxtel, Darren Sharpe and Brett Hevers livestreamed the Danny Green versus Anthony Mundine fight Friday, ABC reported, with both streams attracting tens of thousands of viewers. 

A Foxtel spokesperson said Sunday it was “considering options” and taking advice from lawyers on the “very serious” matter. To watch the bout legally, the company required viewers to pay A$59.95. Read more…

More about Copyright, Danny Green, Anthony Mundine, Australia, and Facebook Live

Powered by WPeMatico

What this NFL player put on Facebook Live cost him $10,000 and now he's very sorry

Https%3a%2f%2fblueprint-api-production.s3.amazonaws.com%2fuploads%2fcard%2fimage%2f363221%2fcf1dd40f-11d5-42fc-9e9b-5eaa719f9d08

Feed-twFeed-fb

Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver Antonio Brown is back with his latest Facebook Live video, but it likely won’t cause an uproar like his last one.

After Pittsburgh’s NFL Divisional Playoff win early this month, Brown used Facebook to livestream the team’s locker room post-game celebration, which included head coach Mike Tomlin calling the New England Patriots “those assholes.”

Tomlin apologized, the Steelers fined Brown $10,000, and now, he’s trying to clear the air. 

“I apologize sincerely that I caught an awkward moment when my coach was talking,” Brown said in the video, posted Wednesday. “I didn’t mean no harm.” Read more…

More about Facebook Live, Football, Nfl, Antonio Brown, and Entertainment

Powered by WPeMatico

An NFL player went on Facebook Live from the locker room and nothing good happened

KANSAS CITY, MP - JANUARY 15: Wide receiver Antonio Brown #84 of the Pittsburgh Steelers is tackled by cornerback Marcus Peters #22 of the Kansas City Chiefs during the second half in the AFC Divisional Playoff game at Arrowhead Stadium on January 15, 2017 in Kansas City, Missouri.  (Photo by Matthew Stockman/Getty Images) Yesterday after the Steelers upset the Chiefs in an AFC playoff game, Steelers wide receiver Antonio Brown decided to go on Facebook Live from the locker room to celebrate with his fans. And the fans loved it – he went live for 17 minutes and had almost 900,000 views within just a few hours, before the video was deleted. A player using technology to celebrate directly with his fans… Read More

Powered by WPeMatico

What a teen's recent livestreamed suicide reveals about mental health and social media

Https%3a%2f%2fblueprint-api-production.s3.amazonaws.com%2fuploads%2fcard%2fimage%2f348280%2fc5430c5b-afdd-41d4-8b51-4d01de189ff6

Feed-twFeed-fb

On Dec. 30, Katelyn Nicole Davis turned on the livestreaming app Live.me at her home in Cedartown, Georgia, and broadcast her own suicide.

As that video spread across the internet and social media, it demonstrated how quickly technology can turn casual spectators into traumatized witnesses. The video also left those who encountered it online or through news reports wondering what would drive a young person — Davis was just 12 — to invite unsuspecting friends and strangers to watch a life vanish before their eyes. 

More about Social Media, Facebook Live, Social Good, Mental Health, and Conversations

Powered by WPeMatico