Boing Boing

Enjoy a startling “vintage cigarette commercial” from Japan

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2oBHeoF2nOc

This is presented on the viral internet as a clever 1991 cigarette commercial for “Sutaffu” cigarettes, but it appears to be from Topknot Detective, an Australian entry in the annals of Steve Oedekerk-style problematic remix humor. Note: includes child subjected to offscreen slapstick violence.

Here is an indisputably real Japanese cigarette commercial from 1991, introducing Sir Charles Sheen as himself:

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Cast of Twin Peaks revival talk about how their characters have changed in revival series

https://youtu.be/3VwbkAMfFlU

The first mind-blowing episode of Twin Peaks aired in 1990. On May 21 this year, Showtime will debut a two-hour episode of the revival series, produced by creators David Lynch and Mark Frost, and starring the original crew. In this video, Kyle MacLachlan, Sherilyn Fenn, Peggy Lipton, Everett McGill, and Wendy Robie talk about what it’s like to play characters for the first time in 25 years.

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Primitive Technology: Turn on the closed captions!

https://youtu.be/uZGFTmK6Yk4

It’s no secret that Boing Boing (along with over 4 million other netizens) loves the Primitive Technology channel on YouTube. We’ve covered this channel numerous times (about a guy making primitive tech in the wilds of Far North Queensland, Australia with nothing but the gym shorts on his ass). I anxiously await each new episode and am like a kid at Christmas when I get the alert that a new one is up.

But this month, thanks to one of the reader comments, I made an amazing discovery. The videos are completely silent. The un-named survivalist, who some have dubbed “Prim,” is really good at showing you what he’s doing so that you can understand it without verbal explanation, and he writes up decent notes that are published along with the videos. But then I saw the comment: “[Turns on captions] That clever bastard has been talking to us the entire time!!” Whoa.

The captions and the notes are pretty similar, but you do get extra content in the captions and you get to see them in situ. I’ve been using closed captioning on my TV recently and have been delighted to see how much additional information you actually get: background conversations you would never hear, song titles and lyrics, and wonderful sound and scene descriptions like “sexual gasping.” So, it’s great to discover another instance of CC being useful.

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Trump advisor Steve Bannon ordered conservative Republicans to vote for Trumpcare and they just laughed at him

Trumpcare went down in flames yesterday, and the flames smelled faintly of burning Trumphair. But the president’s personal humiliation was shared with adviser Steve Bannon, according to reports, whose behavior around conservative Republicans made a joke of Trump’s ultimatum.

Mike Allen quotes him thus:

“Guys, look. This is not a discussion. This is not a debate. You have no choice but to vote for this bill.”

Bannon’s point was: This is the Republican platform. You’re the conservative wing of the Republican Party. But people in the room were put off by the dictatorial mindset.

One of the members replied: “You know, the last time someone ordered me to something, I was 18 years old. And it was my daddy. And I didn’t listen to him, either.”

Bannon’s already plotting his revenge, reports Asawin Suebsaeng.

The general consensus seems to be that the failure to replace Obamacare is unexpectedly bad for both president and GOP: he’s exposed as a crêpe leopard, and them as a bunch of unprincipled bickering morons with nothing to show for 7 years’ empty ranting about Obamacare.

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Favorite tools of Danielle Applestone, CEO of Other Machine Co.

Our guest this week on the Cool Tools Show is Danielle Applestone. Danielle is a material scientist, co-founder and CEO of Other Machine Co., the leading manufacturer of high-precision desktop CNC milling machines. Formerly, Danielle ran a DARPA project to develop digital design software and manufacturing tools for the classroom. Danielle’s team took that technology and launched Other Machine Co. in 2013.

Subscribe to the Cool Tools Show on iTunes | RSS | Transcript | Download MP3 | See all the Cool Tools Show posts on a single page

Show notes:

monarch

Monarch Instrument Examiner 1000 ($1,200)

“I came across this electronic stethoscope as part of our manufacturing process. We would get motors from a manufacturer that looked balanced and met a spec, but once we put the whole machine together, sometimes a machine would have a lot of vibration and we didn’t know how to quantify that vibration or to know what was good or what was bad. … There’s a lot of intuition when you’re putting something complicated together like “Well, it feels right,” or “It doesn’t feel right.” That’s really hard to do so we found this amazing thing, which cut a ton of time out of our manufacturing process and now we have beautiful graphs of everything. We know exactly what things vibrate and which ones don’t. You can use it on musical instruments. It’s an amazing tool. Once you have one you realize how much you needed one in your life.”

Screen Shot 2017-03-20 at 2.39.16 PM

Bicycle inner tubes with holes in them

“I came across bicycle inner tubes with holes in them through a friend who had made a sail boat that was attached only with these bicycle inner tubes —it was a catamaran. The reason why they’re so important is they are waterproof, they stretch, and you don’t have to tie them in knots, so you can latch things together really quickly and then undo them, and make a new configuration. … They’re used a little bit like a bungee cord, but bungee cords are really expensive and you have to make do with the hooks whereas if you take a long inner tube that has a hole in it — you’re not going to use it anyway — slice it up into strips. It’s like a variable length bungee cord, but it also doesn’t have the hooks so you can just wrap it around itself and tuck it under and it’ll stay put.”

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The Encyclopedia of Country Living ($20)

“This is a great tool. This is so comprehensive for every little thing. I moved out into Kentucky and lived on 1200 acres for a while and didn’t have much. It was the go-to for, “Okay, we need to build a shanty for chickens. We need to learn how to clean a chicken.” It has everything, like “How to bury your own dead.” … The thing that’s magic about this book is it has the right level of detail, just enough to get yourself in trouble. … It’s just enough to get you going and then you can kind of DIY the rest. I still use it. The pages are all rained on, and moldy, and whatever, but it’s well loved.”

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X-ray Photoelectron Spectrometer

“Yeah, well we just went from just about the lowest tech to the highest tech thing I’ve ever laid my hands on. … What’s great about this tool is it’s super useful for telling what’s on the surface of materials. I used to be a material scientist and I worked on lithium ion batteries. The surface is where all the action is. There’s not a lot of techniques out there that are nondestructive. Usually, if you invent a material, you have a sample, you have to crush it up or put it on a slide, you have to do something to it that mixes the surface in with the bulk. Sometimes, you don’t want that. … The X-ray Photoelectron Spectrometer is amazing because you can just put a sample in and it’s nondestructive …. How it works is you take a beam of x-ray, so you shoot photons at the surface of your material and those photons have enough energy to pick off electrons. A photon goes in, ejects an electron, and then there’s a collector that collects that electron and measures the kinetic energy, measures how fast it was moving. Then, if you know the energy of your x-ray going in, and the energy of that electron that you caught, you can just subtract and figure out how tightly bound was that electron to my surface. What’s cool about that is if you know how tightly a molecule was hanging onto it’s electron, you can tell what that molecule was. Whether it was a sulfur dioxide, or sulfur monoxide, the electrons that are swimming around those molecules will be held differently depending on what those molecules are. … The place that I used one was at the University of Texas at Austin. They’re quite common, but they’re usually at universities, or national labs … They’re millions of dollars.”

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The BBC is using this excellent photo of Trump for everything

It’s not even clear where it’s from, but alongside various stories about Trump’s healthcare legislation woes, it’s been on the BBC News homepage for what, two days now? For this morning’s one, they’ve started zooming into it. By tomorrow, if the legislation has yet to pass, we’ll be inside his weird angry tired mouth.

If someone could figure out the source (it doesn’t seem to be Reuters) that would be fabulous. I’ve used a fractal image enhancement application to make this 2600-pixel wide enlargement, but it’s just not the same as a nice raw wire shot.

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Trump, 'Art of the Deal' President, 'grapples with rare bout of self-doubt' as Trumpcare implodes

The chaos surrounding Donald Trump and Paul Ryan’s monster of a health care bill grows: a long-planned vote in Congress was called off today, representing a devastating blow to the narcissist-in-chief’s bravado. Late news on Thursday night, “The President told Steve Bannon and Reince Priebus to go to the capital and tell Ryan to call a vote tomorrow,” reports MSNBC at 11:30pm ET.

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'A Border Agent Took My Sister and Me Into a Closet and Sexually Assaulted Us,' say teen sisters

Two sisters who were trying to escape violence and poverty in Guatemala for a better life “became so desperately lost trekking across the Texas desert that when they saw a U.S. Customs and Border Protection truck, they waved for help,” reports the Los Angeles Times. An officer in that truck later confined them by force, and sexually assaulted them, one by one.

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In 1913, Joe Knowles set out to spend two months naked and alone in the Maine woods

In 1913 outdoorsman Joseph Knowles pledged to spend two months in the woods of northern Maine, naked and alone, using only what he was able to find in the forest. In this week’s episode of the Futility Closet podcast we’ll describe Knowles’ adventures in the woods and the controversy that followed his return to civilization.

We’ll also consider the roots of nostalgia and puzzle over some busy brothers.

Show notes

Please support us on Patreon!

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Amy Goodman narrates a gorgeous animation about Chomsky's “Manufacturing Consent”

In this gorgeous video produced by Al Jazeera’s media literacy show The Listening Post, Amy Goodman from Democracy Now narrates an explanation of the “5 Filters of Media Manipulation” set out by Noam Chomsky and Edward S Herman in their 1988 classic Manufacturing Consent, brought to life by Pierangelo Pirak’s spectacular animations. You could hardly ask for a more timely intervention in our current media and political landscape. (via JWZ)

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Zelda: Art & Artifacts is an enormous art book for Hyrule explorers

The Legend of Zelda: Art & Artifacts is a mammoth book containing art and errata from practically every Zelda title ever released. Having spent a mere afternoon with it, I feel I’ve experienced an adolescence-worth of missed gameplay.

I’ve never gotten around to immersing myself in the Zelda games, but was always struck by the their’ precision and economy, a world crafted more than built. There’s a mysticism, even a darkness to Zelda that seems out of place in Nintendo’s cutesy-poo lineup.

A heroic cycle, with a eternally-recurring hero and nemesis, every generation of the mythos is a strange echo of another, and the star is a stoic mute boy defined by his tools and under fate’s control. Hyrule and its hero are less standard RPG fantasy than a uniquely Japanese new wave murmur, an Elric in Arcadia who brings sunshine rather than storm and never has a single brooding thought and gets to live silently ever after.

Published by Dark Horse Books, it’s 424 pages long and weighs 6 pounds. It’s 12.3 x 9.3 inches long and wide and two inches thick. Notes and other documentation are translated by Aria Tanner, Hisashi Kotobuki, Heidl Plechl and Michael Gombos.

Organized roughly by release date (the canonical continuity seems rather murky), there’s early animation-style cels, box art, instruction booklets, and even some work from the latest title, Breath of the Wild, released a couple of weeks ago.

It goes from exquisitely painted concept art right down to detailed sprite sheets from classic 8-bit outings, and the print quality is outstanding. It’s heavy; you could flatten a cat with it.

I can tell that the selections are far from exhaustive, though: this is clearly an official Nintendo item made by and for people who like the word “franchise.” While it’s good and fair that atrocities such as the Philips-licensed CD-i Zelda games are not included, it also means no Katsuya Terada, for example, a brilliant artist whose Zelda work is among the best and the most off-brand going—but which thereby carries less nostalgia value for its audience, perhaps.

Beyond some fascinating interviews with the creators, there’s not much context, either; it’s a companion volume to the “Historia”, a similarly bulky book dealing with the world’s history in detail.

But I have to get it, now, as the art’s sucked me in, and I don’t have time to play 20 video games to understand what the Hyrule is going on.

PROS

• Big, beautiful book.

• Impeccable color reproduction.

• Unfussy page layouts that don’t crowd the art.

• Get shown a fantasy world, rather than told it.

• See an artistic formula evolve over 30 years

CONS

• Demands a prior interest in Zelda, will probably bore everyone else.

• Seriously, it’s mostly pictures of Link.

• Just making super clear here that there is a high “androgynous lads in green leather” noise floor here to contend with, if it’s not your thing.

The Legend of Zelda: Art & Artifacts [Dark Horse Books at Amazon]

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The Minnesotan left-wing economic miracle continues, while neighboring Republican states slowly collapse

Last fall, I wrote about the strange case of Minnesota governor Mark Dayton, a left-wing billionaire heir to the Target fortune who came to power and reversed his Republican predecessors’ Reagonomic idiocy, instead raising taxes on rich people, increasing public spending, and creating shared prosperity for the people of Minnesota.
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Haddon Hall: When David Invented Bowie — a graphic novel about the creativity struggle in the late 60s

It’s hard not to use a word like “groovy” when it comes to describing Haddon Hall: When David Invented Bowie. There’s the setting: a crumbling estate in swinging London, where David Bowie, his wife Angie, and assorted others are living and creating in the late ‘60s. There’s the loose, freewheeling quality to both the lettering and drawings, which use simple outlines and pops of color. And there’s the sly humor, which comes through in both the dialogue and breaks from the main story (which show us how to be a music snob, how to be a fashionista, etc.)

One of the joys of this book is seeing the time period come to life. People like producer Tony Visconti, T. Rex frontman Marc Bolan, original Pink Floyd member Syd Barrett, and dissatisfied Beatle John Lennon pass through these pages. They worry about their music, experiment with sexual identities, and try to fend off feelings of creative envy. And, if they’re Bowie, they develop their most iconic persona (Ziggy Stardust) while dealing with poignant family issues (the hospitalization of his schizophrenic brother Terry).

This book is a delight. I learned plenty about Bowie despite having already read a biography, but Haddon Hall doesn’t feel educational. It shows in its not-too-serious way that creativity can be a grind, and that none of us — not even David Bowie — was born a fully formed artist.

Haddon Hall: When David Invented Bowie

by Néjib

SelfMadeHero

2017, 144 pages, 7.5 x 0.8 x 10 inches, Hardcover

$16 Buy on Amazon

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Trump administration walks back Obama wiretapping claim

In a press conference, Donald Trump spokesman Sean Spicer walked back the president’s tweeted claims that former president Barack Obama had wiretapped Trump Tower during the 2016 election campaign. By “wire tapping” Trump just meant “surveillance and other activities”, and by “President Obama” and “a bad (or sick) guy” he was referring the entirety of the administration, not to Obama personally.

Namely, White House press secretary Sean Spicer said Trump wasn’t referring to wiretapping when he tweeted about wiretapping.
“I think there’s no question that the Obama administration, that there were actions about surveillance and other activities that occurred in the 2016 election,” Spicer said. “The President used the word wiretaps in quotes to mean, broadly, surveillance and other activities.” …

Spicer also said that Trump was referring to the Obama administration broadly — and not accusing Obama of personal involvement — when he tweeted that “Obama had my ‘wires tapped’ in Trump Tower” and accused Obama of being a “bad” or “sick guy.”

Decide for yourself!

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A kid-friendly electronics board that you can program from the web

Peegar is an Arduinio-style electronics kit that you design programs for by dragging and dropping Scratch-style objects around in a browser; when you’re done, the program is converted to a brief snatch of sound that you transmit through the board by plugging a standard audio cable into your device’s headphone jack.
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This durable smartphone tripod is the thinking person's selfie stick

It may be too late to stop the selfie stick craze entirely, but the ARMOR-X Mini-Flexible Phone Tripod is valiantly attempting to anyway. This lightweight, ultra flexible tripod has infinite greater flexibility and functionality than a selfie stick, and actually looks like something a real photographer might use.

The ARMOR-X is completely intuitive and easy to set up anywhere: on your couch, dashboard, surfboard, or even on bumpy surfaces like cliff faces (please watch your step). Made from stainless steel, high density foam, and hardened plastic, it’s engineered for a life of adventure and is universally compatible with any smartphone up to 5.5 inches long. If you want, you can still do the selfie thing by adding a CR2032 button battery to use the Bluetooth remote shutter to snap pictures from a distance. This handy photography tool is on sale for 42% off – $19.99 – today.

Explore other Best-Sellers in our store:

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News anchors honor Notorious B.I.G. by slipping his lyrics into traffic report

Yesterday was the 20-year mark of Notorious B.I.G.’s death, and to pay tribute, Atlanta’s “Action News” anchors Fred Blankenship and Mark Arum on WSB-TV ingeniously slipped in a bunch of Biggie’s lyrics into their traffic report.

A couple of them include: “I know you thought birthdays were the worst days but Thursdays might be the worse day,” and “Ashley, Ashley, Ashley, can’t you see / these downtown delays keep hypnotizin’ me.”

How many more can you find?

P.S. This isn’t new for the duo – last year they honored the late A Tribe Called Quest rapper Phife Dawg, which you can see here:

https://youtu.be/ZRujBI_vPSM

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Amazon's #1 bestseller is a blank 266-page book titled “Reasons to vote for Democrats”

Reasons to vote for Democrats” consists of 266 blank pages, a clever troll gift for all your left-leaning friends and family! But Republicans are so eager to stick it to their adversaries that they’ve paid a collective fortune to push it to the top of Amazon’s bestseller list, inadvertently providing a rather convincing one. CNN reports that it’s the same trick as Why Trump Deserves Trust, Respect and Admiration, published shortly after last year’s election; a blank notebook is a dollar fifty shipped.

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Senate Republicans introduce resolution ensuring ISPs don't need your permission to sell your private data and SSN

Donald Trump’s new FCC boss, Ajit Pai, has nuked an Obama-era rule that banned ISPs from selling off your browsing data, location, financial and health information, children’s information, Social Security Number and contents of your messages, without your permission. The now-defunct rule also required ISPs to notify you when they got hacked and your sensitive personal information got out into the wild.
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Nevertheless, She Persisted: Tor.com's Women's Day flash fiction sf anthology

Celebrate International Women’s Day in stfnal style with Nevertheless She Persisted, a free anthology of original flash fiction by some of science fiction’s leading women voices, from Catherynne M. Valente to Amal El-Mohtar to Jo Walton to Nisi Shawl to Charlie Jane Anders to Seanan McGuire to Alyssa Wong to Kameron Hurley — and more!
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An intimate and poignant graphic novel portraying one family’s journey from war-torn Vietnam

Once I started reading this book, I couldn’t put it down. Thi Bui’s debut illustrated memoir, The Best We Could Do , is an exploration of family and identity, past and present. In the preface, Bui explains that the evolution of the work, from an oral history project turned handmade book 15 years ago to its current form as a graphic novel, meant she needed to learn to draw comics, an undertaking she describes as having a “steep learning curve.” Based on her stunningly narrative art which breathes and runs and wonders and mourns and serves as the perfect medium for the story of survival it tells, I’d say she made it over that learning curve just fine.

Though her own understanding of self — as a parent and a child — is inextricably tied to, and informed by, her specific experience as a Vietnamese American whose family fled to the US in the 1970s after the collapse of South Vietnam, the pressure, guilt, and confusion she feels as a mother and daughter are easily recognizable. Bui begins with her own labor and delivery, long and complicated. It yields, of course, the birth of her son but also a deeper empathy for her own mother. With the new found perspective of a parent trying to understand her role and relationships within her family of origin and that which she has now created, Bui takes readers back through her own childhood and her parents’. Through Cambodia, Vietnam, and the US, through the First Indochina War, to the Vietnam War, to the aftermath, in boats and bunkers and shared beds, through two generations of both unknowing and surety, of flight and fight, we come to know the Buis, Thi, Má, and Bố especially, as individuals within a family.

This book is beautiful. It is personally meditative while also deeply informative, telling the history that lives in one family’s bones while spanning multiple nations, borders, and generations.

The Best We Could Do: An Illustrated Memoir

by Thi Bui

Abrams ComicArts

2017, 336 pages, 7.0 x 1.6 x 9.3 inches, Hardcover

$15 Buy on Amazon

See sample pages from this book at Wink.

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Punctuation inflation has infected the tabloids!

Extraordinary!!!

Exclamation points have over-run the tabloids like Macaques monkeys swarming the streets of New Delhi – and with much the same effect.

Every story on the cover of the ‘Globe’ merits its own angry exclamation point: “Hillary Caught Taking Bribes!” “Barack okayed the shady deal!” “Scandal: Her ties to Russia exposed!” “Now they’ll both go to jail!” “Priscilla Elopes With Tom!” “Now they’re raising Lisa Marie’s twins, 8!” “Travolta secret sex swap!”

The ‘National Enquirer’ is no better: “Prez Trump Tell-All: How I’m Cleaning Up Obama’s Mess!” “Making Medicine Cheap Again!” “25 Million New High Paying Jobs!” “$3 Trillion Economic Jump-Start!” “Jackson’s Diary Proves He Was Murdered!” “Daughter Paris Is Right!”
So many exclamation points! It’s exhausting!

Exclamation marks are intended to emphasize something of major interest, but punctuation inflation has infected the tabloids, so that every story is screaming for attention, and as a result nothing seems shocking any more.

“Judy Garland Was Murdered!” screams the cover to the ‘National Examiner.’ Yawn. “Tom Selleck Secret Medical Crisis!” Okay – he reportedly has arthritis. Shocking. And the exclamation points keep coming: “Warren Beatty Turns 80! Inside His Amazing Life!” “Judge Judy’s $200 million Garage Sale!” “Cruise Ship Murders!”

Virtually every story in this week’s ‘Enquirer’ is cursed with an exclamation point, with only a handful of notable exceptions: the “Ask The Vet” column offering pet advice, the so-dubious-we-don’t-believe-it-for-a-minute headline about country singer Blake Shelton: “Blake Back On The Bottle?” and the photo of Caroline Kennedy in a swimsuit under the headline: “Camelot Comes to the Caribbean,” for which I assume a sub-editor will be fired for failing to add the obligatory exclamation point.

Otherwise, exclamation points are called upon to add urgency and importance to such dubious news stories as: “Caitlyn’s Crushing on Boy George!” “Judge Wapner’s Verdict on Judy: Overpaid!” “Hard Workouts Weaken Sex Drive!” and “Keeping A Cool Head!” (a story about the so-called “International Hair Freezing Contest” at Takhini Hot Springs spa.)

The celebrity glossy magazines are hardly immune to punctuation inflation.

“My Dream Baby!” screams the cover of ‘People’ magazine, reporting on ‘Today’ show host Hoda Kotb’s baby adoption. “Ben & Jen Divorce on Hold!” ‘Us’ magazine offers us “Ali’s Wedding Album!” with the assumption that we all know TV’s former ‘Bachelorette’ Ali Fedotowsky, and are shocked – shocked!! – that she’s finally tied the knot.

The celebrity magazines appear to use exclamation points more as decorative touches than to mark an extraordinary story.

“Life’s a Beach!” screams the ‘People’ headline above a photo of ‘Dancing With The Stars’ alumnus Julianne Hough, who is intriguingly not pictured at a beach or even near a beach, but instead is seen aboard a luxury yacht in Mexico. “Harry And Meghan’s Date!” yells a ‘People’ headline above a blurry long-distance photo of Prince Harry and girlfriend Meghan Markle holding hands in Jamaica. “Brie Larson: She’s Also a Photographer!” Extraordinary – an actress who can take photos too! Whatever next?

‘Us’ magazine seems more enamored of the exclamation point, capping all its photo headlines in its “Hot Pics!” section: “Royal Island Romance!” “”J. Lo Shimmers!” “Olsens Under Cover!” “Taking Paws on the Go!” “A Girlfriends’ Getaway!” “Good Times, for Shore!” “Love’s Afloat for Dev!” “Smooth Political Moves!” “An Emerald Queen B!”

Enough already!

Fortunately, we have the crack investigative team at ‘Us’ mag to tell us that Kendall Jenner wore it best, Emily Deschanel loses her keys or phone “multiple times a day,” ‘The Catch’ star Sonya Walger carries lip gloss, anti-perspirant and her son’s model toy car in her Mansur Gavriel satchel, and that the stars are just like us: they share snacks, ride bikes, play soccer, and run errands. “Stars: They’re Just Like Us!” proclaims the headline. Because nothing could be more extraordinary than seeing a star eating or playing tennis.

The award for the most appropriate use of an exclamation point this week goes to the ‘Examiner,’ with its headline: “Jet Has A Near Miss – With A UFO!” This supposedly occurred before “hundreds of air show spectators” who saw a jet pass an unidentified object in the sky. A weather balloon? An orbiting satellite? “Nobody knows for sure what exactly the mysterious disk is . . . ” reports the ‘Examiner,’ ” . . . but it could be alien-based.”

Onwards and downwards . . .

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Rabbit hole in England leads to 700-year old Knights Templar cave

The BBC reports that an “ordinary rabbit’s hole in a farmer’s field leads to an underground sanctuary once said to be used by the Knights Templar.”

Michael Scott, from Birmingham, went to photograph the caves after seeing a video of them online. He said: “I traipsed over a field to find it, but if you didn’t know it was there you would just walk right past it. Considering how long it’s been there it’s in amazing condition, it’s like an underground temple.”
The tunnel leads to a network of walkways and arches carved out of sandstone, as well as a font.

The cave is evidently a hot place to hang out if you’re a witch. Be sure to ask the property owners nicely and clean up after the ritual is complete.

One year after Christmas, the labyrinth of intricately carved chambers was found to be filled with candles, sinister symbols scrawled on the walls and more besides.

The owners of the site, hidden in dense woodland ten miles from Wolverhampton, decided enough was enough when two warlocks knocked on the door – and asked for their robes back.

The red-faced pair had left the garments behind after a ritual.

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Bob Mankoff, New Yorker's cartoon editor, is retiring

Bob Mankoff, legendary cartoonist, is stepping down as The New Yorker‘s cartoon editor at the end of April. Here’s a playlist of great videos on the nature of comedy and on the form as practiced in the New Yorker.

PS: In B4 “Christ, what an asshole” comment.

Cartoon Stereotypes | The Cartoon Lounge (YouTube / The New Yorker)

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